DETROIT -

A Detroit mother and Chevrolet Cobalt owner found herself in a frustrating catch-22.

She wants to park her recalled car and drive a safer loaner from GM. But when she went to pick up the car she was told, "Sorry, you're too young."

"I'm terrified. My 2-year-old goes with me everywhere. I'm terrified," said Cyanne Horton.

Horton has used a single key for weeks, just like GM instructs to do with the vehicles under a faulty ignition switch recall. But on Monday in a busy intersection, her car quit. Then on her way to pick up a loaner, it quit again.

Complete coverage: GM ignition switch recall investigation

There's no way to confirm if the stall-outs are related to the recall switches. But when she got to the dealership she found an even bigger surprise. The 20-year-old mom was told she's too young for a rental.

"It's horrible. What is GM planning for young drivers? This is an economy car, good on gas mileage. I thought it was meant for young people," she said.

We swapped cars and I drove her vehicle to Matick Chevrolet in Redford Township. It was a misunderstanding. The dealer's insurance only allows customers over 25 to rent and Enterprise Rental's minimum age is 21.

Enterprise will rent to drivers 18 and over if they purchase additional coverage. Meanwhile, GM also intervened and agreed to cover all expenses.

"Now that we know about this little loophole, we'll put the word out young drivers are eligible for loaners," said John Peters, Matick Chevrolet service manager.

Within an hour Matick and Enterprise had Cayenne and little Cameron in a safer car.

"It took you guys to get GM to respond, to get Matick to respond to get me to get a rental, I really appreciate it," she said.

With that wrinkle ironed out, now all they need is parts. As of late Tuesday afternoon dealers we contacted were still waiting. After they get them they think it may take 2 to 3 weeks to get the first batch of recalled cars fixed.

More: GM's fix for vehicles with faulty ignition switch begins