DETROIT -

Following the passing of William Clay Ford Sr., his wife, Martha, will continue his controlling stake in ownership of the Detroit Lions.

"She and her four children will continue to be involved in the ownership of the franchise, as they have during Mr. Ford’s tenure," the team said in a statement on Monday.

Ford's son, William Clay Ford, Jr., remains vice chairman.

Ford Sr., the last surviving grandchild of automotive pioneer Henry Ford and owner of the Lions died Sunday. He was 88.

Ford Motor Co. said in a statement that Ford died of pneumonia at his home in Grosse Pointe. Ford helped steer the family business for more than five decades. He bought one of his own, the National Football League franchise in the Motor City, a half-century ago.

He served as an employee and board member of the automaker for more than half of its 100-year history.

"My father was a great business leader and humanitarian who dedicated his life to the company and the community," William Clay Ford Jr., executive chairman of Ford Motor Co. and Lions vice chairman, said in a statement. "He also was a wonderful family man, a loving husband, father, grandfather and great-grandfather. He will be greatly missed by everyone who knew him, yet he will continue to inspire us all."

Ford was regarded as a dignified man by the select few who seemed to know him well. To the masses in Detroit, he was simply the owner of the Lions who struggled to achieve success on the field despite showing his passion for winning by spending money on free agents, coaches, executives and facilities.

Ford's first full season leading the Lions was in 1964, seven years after the franchise won the NFL title. The lone playoff victory he enjoyed was in 1992. The Lions are the only team to go 0-16 in a season, hitting rock bottom in 2008. After an 11-year drought, the Lions improved enough to make the playoffs in 2011 only to lose a combined 21 games over the next two seasons.

Ford Field -- a spectacular 65,000-seat, $315 million indoor stadium -- opened in 2002 that, coupled with a state-of-the-art team headquarters in nearby Allen Park, gave the Lions the best facilities money could buy.

But a blueprint for consistently winning was elusive. From Ford's first season as team owner to his last, the Lions won 310 games, lost 441 and tied 13. His .441 winning percentage with the Lions was the NFL's worst among teams that existed in 1964, according to STATS LLC.

Born into an automotive fortune in 1925 bearing what was already a household name, Ford was the youngest of Edsel B. Ford's four children. He was 23 when he joined the Ford Motor Co. board of directors in 1948, one year after the death of his grandfather, Henry Ford.

Ford remained a company director until 2005, later taking the title of director emeritus.