CLEVELAND -

This year, the month of September has five Mondays. And if you hate them all, you're not alone.

Whether they're manic or blue, research finds one in three of us dread Mondays more than any other day of the week. The biggest complaint? Feeling stressed out about everything that needs to be done.

"Those 'have to's' start getting into your head, instead of the 'want to's.' Weekend is full of 'want to's,' work is full of 'have to's,'" said Dr. Joe Rock, a psychologist at Cleveland Clinic.

Rock said if you're trying to make Monday better, you have to start with Sunday night. He suggested finding something to do on Sunday night that you enjoy -- watch a movie, visit with friends, or listen to music. That activity will keep your thoughts from drifting back to Monday.

Preparing for the next day is also key. Sunday night, be sure to iron your work clothes or make your lunch. It will make Monday mornings less hectic.

When you get to work on Monday, try to ease into your workday. Get some coffee, catch-up with co-workers, and “settle” into the work week.

"Just do what you need to do Monday morning," said Rock. "If you have any discretion about what you need to do, pick the things that you like the most. If you've got to call 10 people, call the one you like first."

Scheduling something to look forward to can also help.

"If you plan some things for early in the week, like I am going to get out of the building for lunch today instead of eating at my desk, I'm going to meet a friend for a drink after work, I am going out to dinner with someone on Tuesday," said Rock. "It's something concrete to look forward to that competes with all of the stuff that is going to be rushing through your mind otherwise about work."

Finally, if Mondays are particularly difficult for you, you may want to stop sleeping in on weekends. Experts say those extra hours shift your body clock just enough to make you feel extra fatigued on Monday and Tuesday mornings.