Robin A.F. Olson of Newtown, Conn., founder and president of Kitten Associates Inc., a rescue organization, said her cats are always reaching for toys or treats with one paw or another.

Olson said she was born left-handed, but her mother didn’t want her growing up left-handed in a world of right-handed people. “She always handed things to me close to my right hand. She always put the crayons in my right hand.”

There won’t be any such lessons for her cats, she said. “I try not to be judgmental of my cats’ abilities or lack thereof. We will never worry about the anti-paw.”

It appears that Nora, an internationally acclaimed 8-year-old piano-playing tabby from Philadelphia, owned by piano teacher Betsy Alexander and her artist-photographer husband, Burnell Yow, is right-pawed. Yow studied her videos and “determined that she appears to lead with her right paw, then follow with her left,” Alexander said.

But she has her ambidextrous, headstrong moments.

“She uses both paws to reach for specific notes, even black notes ... and she uses her head to roll a series of multiple notes.”