DETROIT -

Whether it's a day at the beach or a trip to a Detroit Tigers game, many of you have probably been tempted to call in sick to work, when you're not really sick. USA Today featured a survey from Careerbuilder.com that found in the past year nearly a third of employees faked an illness to skip work.

Careerbuilder.com polled 3,976 employees and 2,494 managers. It found some very lame excuses, and it also found that many employers will check your story.

Lame Excuses

Here's a list of some of the lame excuses highlighted in the newspaper article.

"Employee was upset after watching The Hunger Games."

"Employee's dead grandmother was being exhumed for a police investigation."

"Employee's hair turned orange from dying her hair at home."

Rosemary Haefner, CareerBuilder vice president for human resources told USA Today there are a variety of reasons why employees feel they can fake a sick day. "They think,'I've got to use it or lose it," she explained.

That can lead to using sick days for holiday shopping. According to the survey, December is the most popular month for sick days.

Don't Get Caught!

Of course these days, if you decide to call in sick, don't leave any evidence you were faking it. We've all heard the stories of how a photoon Facebook can lead to trouble back at work. Since, friends can tag you without your knowledge, you're taking a risk getting caught on camera at the big game, if you're supposed to be home with the flu.

According to the survey, nearly 30% of employers have checked up on a worker to verify that the sick time was warranted, usually by requiring a doctor's note or phoning the workers at home. It also found 17% have fired an employee for giving a phony excuse.

So, before you pull a Ferris Bueller, keep that in mind.