DETROIT -

Chrysler

Chrysler says its U.S. sales jumped 27 percent in October because of strong demand for its Jeep and Chrysler brand vehicles. It was the company's best October sales since 2007.

Chrysler sold more than 114,000 cars and trucks last month compared with 90,000 a year earlier.

The company was among the first of the car companies to report sales figures on Tuesday. Sales overall were expected to rise last month to the best pace in two years. People who put off buying cars last summer because Japanese brands were in tight supply returned to the market in October.

Chrysler says its sales were led by the Chrysler 200 midsize sedan, the Jeep Compass compact sport utility vehicle and the Ram pickup truck.

General Motors

General Motors Co.'s U.S. sales rose 2 percent in October, led by the Chevrolet Cruze compact and Equinox crossover.

The company sold nearly 187,000 cars and trucks last month. Car sales were up 4 percent and trucks were up 2 percent. But sales of the company's crossover sport utility vehicles fell 1 percent.

The GM sales increase probably won't be as big as those reported by other automakers who report sales on Tuesday. The company says it had strong sales in October 2010.

Cruze sales nearly tripled from last year, Equinox sales rose 18 percent.

Sales overall were expected to rise last month to the best pace in two years. People who put off buying cars last summer because Japanese brands were in tight supply returned to the market.

Ford

Ford Motor Co. says its U.S. sales were up 6 percent in October thanks to strong sales of pickups and SUVs.

Sales of the Ford Explorer SUV more than tripled over last October, while F-Series pickup sales rose 7 percent.

Ford said car sales fell 8 percent. Among Ford's cars, only the subcompact Fiesta and the midsize Fusion saw small increases from last October.

Ford's luxury Lincoln brand also saw sales fall 11 percent. The company is in the midst of revamping that brand.

Analysts are expecting strong sales for the industry in October, partly because there were fewer earthquake-related shortages at Japanese automakers.