DETROIT -

The Detroit Catholic Archdiocese issued some strong words Monday on who should and should not receive communion.

Holy Communion is the heart of the Catholic mass; it is a belief in the actual presence of Christ.

In a statement Archbishop Allen Vigneron compared Catholics who publicly support gay marriage and receive communion to a form of perjury.

The archbishop said, "In effect, they would contradict themselves. This sort of behavior would result in publicly renouncing one's integrity and logically bring shame for a double-dealing that is not unlike perjury."

Mark McMillan works for Affirmations, a group supporting the gay, lesbian bisexual and transgender community.

"It seems fascinating to me that all of a sudden the church would pick and choose this over this, and say we are going to withhold communion. What about this other stuff, I don't understand why that's not so important as well," said McMillan.

Today the archdiocese broadened the restrictions in a statement saying that Catholics should not take communion if they publically oppose "any serious matter of the Church's teaching. For example, whether it be a rejection of the divinity of Christ, racist beliefs, support for abortion, or support for redefining marriage."

McMillan says he was once a Roman Catholic, but left the church after coming out as gay.

"Those that didn't support me more often were, in my opinion, practicing catholic. And I tended to stop hanging out with them and I stopped going to a Catholic church. It didn't support me. I don't believe in a condemning god. I don't believe in my life style being an abomination. I don't believe that," said McMillan.

There is no indication that priests are being directed to withhold communion.

Archbishop Vigneron says pastors are ready to "assist Catholics in performing their religious acts with integrity so that they can avoid this personal disaster."