DETROIT -

In a few short hours the governor will sign the so-called "grand bargain" that will bring nearly $200 million to Detroit. At the same time, a city creditor wants to know exactly what Detroit retirees have in the bank.

That creditor is essentially demanding to know what's in the wallets of the thousands of Detroit pensioners who spent years working for the city.

"Who in their possible right mind could ask me for my personal financial information?" asked Linda Peltier.

Peltier spent 26 years on the job at the Detroit Police Department. Since Detroit filed for Chapter 9, it's been nothing but stress over finances and the future.

Now Detroit creditor Syncora wants to be privy to Peltier's personal financial details, along with all other Detroit retirees.

It's just another big reminder that while so much progress has been made, there's still more legal wrangling to come in the weeks ahead in the city's landmark bankruptcy case.

Still, Friday morning it's full steam ahead as the governor visits Detroit to ink the deal that will send $194 million in state money to back-fill pensions and save the Detroit Institute of Arts.