DETROIT -

Wayne County Prosecutor Kym L. Worthy will announce a charging decision Tuesday in Cass Tech High School football star Jayru Campbell's alleged assault of a school security guard.

Video from inside the school allegedly shows 17-year-old Campbell body-slam the security guard, who did not suffer serious injury.

Campbell was arrested and later released by Detroit police.

Worthy is expected to announce what charges, if any, the teen will face for the alleged assault. Her news conference is scheduled for 2 p.m. Tuesday.

The assistant prosecutor is recommending two charges -- assault with the intent to do great bodily harm and aggravated assault. The first is a felony which carries a possible 10-year sentence. The second is a 1-year misdemeanor.

Attorney Jerome Sabotta believes Worthy will bring down the charges.

"If they charge just one offense, let's say it's assault with the intent to do great bodily harm, and the jury doesn't find that and (Worthy) doesn't charge initially aggravated assault, the jury can't consider that, so the jury could acquit him," said Sabotta.

Because of his age, Campbell may have alternatives which work in his favor.

"He's what they call HYTA eligible. Which is the Holmes Youth Trainee Act for an individual between the ages of 17 and 21 who commits an offense. He can be placed on a diversion program but at the end of the probationary period the charges could be dismissed and he wouldn't have a record," said Sabotta.

Legal experts say it's all about Campbell's intent. Was he trying to really hurt the guard?

Sabotta said prosecutors mainly looked at where the guard landed, which was on his head. That could have caused serious injury.

Read back: Jayru Campbell free, no charges yet

Campbell, a junior quarterback with Cass Tech, has been highly recruited by college football programs. Michigan State University offered him a scholarship and he gave a verbal commitment to the East Lansing school.

The university won't comment on whether Campbell's scholarship would be pulled.

It released this statement: "NCAA rules prohibit institutions from commenting on specific prospects until a National Letter of Intent has been signed."