DETROIT -

As we countdown to the Primary Election, ClickOnDetroit.com is excited to welcome community leaders to write columns about issues they feel passionately about.

For at least the past week, conversation surrounding the presidential election has centered on Bain Capital and the role Mitt Romney did or did not play within or on behalf of the company. The questions raised and demands for answers are legitimate in this matter, as they are with all issues that provide some insight into who the candidates are, and what characteristics and commitments they bring to their platforms.

On the other hand, the discussion of what information should be made public has become the bane—or Bain, of the political process for this race as it raises legitimate concerns about the level and degree of disclosure candidates should honor. While the Disclose Act of 2012 snakes it way through the Senate to ensure disclosure of political backers and campaign contributors, there’s a level of disclosure that should be expected—and provided-- from the candidate with or without a formal mandate.

Those in the public eye and especially those running for public office are under a heightened level of scrutiny that dictates they disclose or clarify nearly every aspect of their personal and professional existence. Like it or not, technology, social media and the delivery of real time information means nothing is a secret. Nor should it be.

What you’ve done helps to define who you are whether or not that is the person you want others to see.. When asking to represent a vast and varied population in the capacity of President of the United States, one must be willing and responsive to inquiries and requests, and not just those that paint a candidate in the most favorable light. From school-yard altercations to tax returns to last week’s dinner choices, everything is a litmus test of character and qualifications.

As a candidate for this country’s highest office, you are fair game, and so is everything you’ve ever said or done. To continue wrangling with what should or should not be made public or avoiding disclosure during this or any election cycle is a waste of taxpayer’s time and an insult to their intelligence. Tell us, and let the people decide.

Related: Election 2012: Great expectations

About the author:

Karen Dumas is a communications professional/media personality/public speaker committed to excellence, entrepreneurship and equality.  She is also the former Chief of Communications & External Affairs for Mayor Dave Bing and the City of Detroit.

Dumas attracted readers, listeners and viewers and garnered respect as a trusted and fair radio & television personality and columnist. Frequently referred to as “honest and engaging”, HOUR Detroit recognized her radio show as the “the more intelligent choice” for listeners. As founder of her own PR firm, Images & Ideas, Inc., she earned a reputation as a communications specialist known for performance and perfection.

She serves on the Communication Committee for the Detroit Riverfront Conservancy, the Arts League of Michigan, and the Editorial Advisory Board for BLAC Magazine, and previously on the PR committee for the NCAA Final Four/Detroit, among many others. The City of Detroit, State of Michigan, Real Times Media, and several Who’s Who entities have recognized her achievements.

She is a frequent guest speaker at schools, churches and professional organizations seeking insight into performance based practices, the tools for success, living and treating others with fairness, women’s challenges in the workplace, and balancing professional and personal roles. Her professional but entertaining demeanor enhances any event or organized gathering; her presentations are informative and inspirational for all.

Dumas graduated from East Catholic High School, and Michigan State University where she received a Bachelor of Science degree from Michigan State University. She is also the published author of, “In Other Words: A Collection of Thoughts & Columns.”  She and her husband reside in Detroit with their two children.

For more information, visit www.KarenDumas.com and www.imagesandideasinc.com