Taylor School District inherits Inkster students, unused school buildings

Taylor doesn't want burden of maintaining Inkster school buildings

Author: Guy Gordon, Local 4 Anchor, @newsGuy4, guyg@wdiv.com
Published On: Sep 17 2013 07:12:10 PM EDT   Updated On: Sep 17 2013 07:23:38 PM EDT
TAYLOR, Mich. -

The Taylor School District has been put in charge of several of Inkster’s now unused school buildings.

It is extra property Taylor doesn't want.

Taylor was prepared to welcome Inkster students but it wasn't prepared to bear the burden of the buildings those kids once occupied.

Read: Inkster schools officially dissolve.

Now Taylor is cutting the grass and paying for the lights after inheriting a middle school, an elementary and another building abandoned years ago.

The district has no need for them and Taylor has its own deficit.

Read: Taylor addresses class sizes concern.

Staffing has taking a 10 percent cut to help eliminate the deficit but the building burden could bring them a step closer to becoming just like Inkster.

"So we have to maintain the buildings, so we have to do utilities and insurance and security and we are not sure how that will negatively affect our deficit," said Taylor Superintendent Diane Allen.

The property transfer was part of the legislation rushed through Lansing this summer dissolving the Inkster system. 

Taylor is turning to the Intermediate School District for answers, but there's not much guidance in the law.

"This legislation was passed in a very short period of time and I think that there are things that fell through the cracks that they didn't think about," said Superintendent at Wayne RESA Chris Wigent.

Residents just wish their money was going for their kids.

"It's not fair to the people in Taylor because of the money they put into Taylor. It shouldn't have to go to another city," said Taylor resident Erica Neff.

"It almost seems to me that it hasn't been very well thought out," said Allen.

This isn't just an Inkster vs. Taylor problem.

Michigan has 55 distressed school districts and any neighboring community around them could find themselves in the same boat if this unintended consequence isn't addressed.