WARREN, Mich. -

The city of Warren saw more than 18,000 homes fall victim to this week's flooding, adding up to about $1.2 billion in damage, according to Mayor Jim Fouts.

Fouts said assessors have been surveying homes since Monday's storm and the city estimates 18,047 homes are flood-damaged.

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"It is more widespread than anyone thought," said Fouts in a news release. "Every neighborhood has been hit."

Warren residents are encouraged to place water-damaged items at the curb regardless of their trash pickup day. The mayor said he approved overtime hours for sanitation and water department workers.

"Our sanitation employees are working 12 hours, and this weekend, to pick up items at the curb, and our goal is to have the city cleared by next week," said Fouts.

Some of the worst flooding in Warren was on Interstate 696 where vehicles were left stranded and submerged after Monday's historic rainfall. Nearby communities such as Royal Oak and Huntington Woods also had neighborhoods underwater.

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An emergency city hall hotline -- 586-574-4526 -- has been set-up by the mayor for those in need of assistance with clean-up of their flooded basements.

Insurance claims can be filed by contacting 586-574-4670.

Macomb County property owners should call the information hotline at 586-493-6767 and/or complete a “damage assessment report form” that can be found on the county Emergency Management website or at a local government office.

For additional questions, send an email tomcoem@mcombgov.org.

Macomb County also has established a damage assessment reporting center at the Southwest Health Center located at 27690 Van Dyke, Warren, 48093 for those residents who do not have access to a computer or need assistance in completing the form.

More: Red Cross opens shelter after floods