DETROIT -

Mike Duggan won't appeal to get to his name back on the ballot for Detroit mayor.

Duggan made the announcement Wednesday, saying "The damage that has been caused by these court rulings, saying that I wasn’t on the ballot in the first place, I just think is too much to overcome."

Duggan said he accepts responsibility.

UNCUT: Duggan drops bid for mayor

"I’ve heard criticism of campaign staff and lawyers, but there just isn’t any merit. There isn’t anyone to blame but me," he said. "I read the charter language myself and handled the moving, establishing residency, voter registration and the filing."

Duggan said he will stay in Detroit and continue to work in the community.

"I think we’ll always wish the voters of Detroit could have made the decision for themselves and it not had to be made by judges," he said.

Duggan said he won't pursue a write-in campaign and isn't sure yet if he'll support another candidate in the race.

What happened:

The Michigan's Court of Appeals on Tuesday ruled that the ex-Detroit Medical Center chief shouldn't appear on the city's Aug. 6 mayoral primary ballot.

The panel said Duggan didn't meet the City Charter's residency requirement.

Duggan filed his petitions on April 2, more than a month before the city's legal filing deadline of May 14.

However, Duggan legally became a Detroit resident on April 16.

By filing before April 16, the two courts ruled he hadn't been a resident for a full year yet.

"I only blame myself. I should have not given them any chance to twist it in a way to take it off the ballot," Duggan said. "I should have

The panel split 2-1.

Watch: Duggan responds to appeals court's denial

Mayoral candidate Tom Barrow successfully challenged Duggan's ballot placement in circuit court on the grounds that he hadn't lived in Detroit a full year before filing to run.

Tom Barrow and Robert Davis

--Tom Barrow

Watch: Barrow's press conference after appeals court ruling

Duggan had appealed the ruling to the higher court.

Duggan took one last shot at Barrow by saying, "Tom Barrow's ambition in life is to be mayor in Detroit. Letting the voters make the decision hasn't really worked out for him."

Barrow had run three previous times for mayor.

He had been considered one of the leading candidates to succeed Mayor Dave Bing, who is not seeking re-election.