DETROIT -

A narrow band of snow will cross the area this evening, giving us a dusting of snow, but likely enough to move us into first place for Detroit’s all-time snowiest month.

Lows in the low to mid 20s.

We could see a bit of sun Friday morning, but clouds will increase during the day, and light snow is possible by late afternoon. Highs in the upper 20s.

Snow continues Friday night, becomes heavier toward Saturday morning, and continues through the day Saturday. There's quite a bit of disagreement among my computer models not in the timing, but in the amount.

Fortunately, we're still two days away, so I have time to refine this forecast for you tomorrow. But for now, I'm planning on a band somewhere in the vicinity of 4" to 8" to extend along a line from Port Huron to Howell to Kalamazoo, with amounts gradually tapering off the farther south we go, with those of you near the Michigan-Ohio state line seeing the least due to the possibility that a little freezing rain or rain could mix in across our southern counties...this cuts down on the snow totals.

Highs Saturday ranging from upper 20s north to low 30s south, which means that it'll be warm enough to go out and play in the snow, and it should be a fairly good packing snow for snowballs and snow forts!

Partly cloudy to mostly sunny on Groundhog Day. Highs in the mid 20s. It's always fun to see how a furry rodent that lives in a condo will react when it gets woken from its hibernation by a bunch of guys in top hats who had a little party the night before and made up its forecast then.

Have you ever noticed that the groundhog is pulled out before the sun is high enough in the sky to even cast any shadows? They show this famous tradition every year on the Today Show, so watch for it this Sunday morning!

Mostly sunny on Monday, but cold, with highs in the upper teens to near 20.

Partly cloudy on Tuesday, then increasing clouds.

A chance for snow later in the day. Highs in the low 20s. Snow continues through Tuesday night into Wednesday. If you've been following my forecasts all week long, I've been discussing the potential for this snow storm. Yesterday's models trended farther southeast with the storm, thus decreasing its impact on us.

Today's models are trending a bit farther back to the northwest...giving us a better chance of snow (although the heaviest snow would still be in Ohio). If this trend of pulling the storm back closer to Michigan continues through the weekend, then we could be looking at another big snowstorm. And by the way, for those of you wondering why there is so much uncertainty about this storm, consider that the storm doesn't actually exist yet.

The upper level disturbance that will become this storm is over the Pacific, and we won't get a good indication of its structure until it reaches our continent - where our weather balloons will then be able to study it.

Once that hard data gets into our computer models, the models will be better able to project its physics.

Weather links to use: