DETROIT -

It will be mostly clear for most of Tuesday night with temperatures averaging around -4 by morning and wind chills between -15 and -20.

Accordingly, the National Weather Service continues the Wind Chill Advisory until 10 a.m. Wednesday. It’s going to be a close call for some schools with their decision to have or not have school on Wednesday. If you have kids in school, keep a close eye on our FAST AND EASY TO USE school closing page here on ClickOnDetroit.com.

We'll get some sunshine on Wednesday, and temperatures won't be nearly as brutal, with afternoon highs in the mid teens. Southwest wind at 15 to 20 mph will still keep wind chills during the day below zero.

Partly cloudy skies will gradually cloud over on Thursday, and light snow should develop by mid to late afternoon. Highs in the mid 20s. Light snow continues Thursday night. Total accumulation right now looks to be around an inch, possibly a bit more north of M-59.

Lows in the upper teens. As I mentioned Monday, this snow will likely be more than enough to push us over the top into first place as the snowiest overall month we've ever had here in Detroit!

Following a partly cloudy Friday with highs in the mid 20s, my computer models are suggesting a 1-to-2-inch snowfall on Saturday to start our February. There are some differences in how the models are handling this storm. I’ll keep you updated.

Sunday -- Groundhog Day -- looks mostly sunny with highs near 20. By the way, rumor has it that the Groundhog has had enough of this winter, resigned and flew to St. Thomas.

Monday also looks quiet, with highs near 20.

This is where the forecast gets REALLY interesting. I've been watching the long-range models for several days now as they project a potentially strong winter storm in the Tuesday-Wednesday time frame. On Tuesday, the GFS, DGEX, and ECMWF models all suggest some part of southeast Michigan under the gun for significant snowfall. Obviously, any forecast 192 hours in advance can change significantly. However, it is a bit disconcerting to see this kind of similarity among all three of these models (which still can change).

This will be my focus the rest of this week, and I'll keep you posted on the possibilities for yet another disruptive winter storm.

Stay tuned.