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Fitness tackers aren't that accurate, research suggests

Dr. McGeorge shows you how they work and how they can help improve your health.
Dr. McGeorge shows you how they work and how they can help improve your health.

Fitness trackers are designed to encourage people to exercise, but researchers are finding they aren't as accurate as we thought.

They tested popular fitness tackers and found many of them don't accurately measure the amount of activity people are doing.

The study found the Fitbit Flex had an error rate of 16.8 percent, mostly when it came to strength-based activities.

The Nike Fuel Band performed well with aerobic activities but had an inaccuracy rate of more than 17 percent.

The Jawbone Up 24 had an error rate of more than 18 percent when it came to resistance activities.

The Misfit Shine Band had the worst error rate overall at more than 30 percent.

All of the bands had errors in their ability to monitor activities while sitting still.

Researchers hope the trackers will continue to motivate people to exercise anyway.