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Metro Detroit sneaker community steps up to help get shoes back to Florida man

The experience Jay Eldridge had selling shoes from his home in Florida to a buyer in metro Detroit had him thinking twice about dealing with people here who are looking to buy a rare pair of shoes. But that has changed.
The experience Jay Eldridge had selling shoes from his home in Florida to a buyer in metro Detroit had him thinking twice about dealing with people here who are looking to buy a rare pair of shoes. But that has changed.


DETROIT – The buying, selling and trading of ultra-exclusive, ultra-expensive sneakers is one popular, big business.

The experience Jay Eldridge had selling shoes from his home in Florida to a buyer in metro Detroit had him thinking twice about dealing with people here who are looking to buy a rare pair of shoes.

"Shipping wise, yeah I would have had a problem. I probably wouldn't have shipped anymore after this situation if I couldn't get my sneakers back," he said.

Eldridge accidentally shipped two pairs of shoes to a buyer named Nick, who is a teenager in Macomb. The total value was $2,000. Nick claimed he never received the shoes and immediately blocked Eldridge on Facebook so he couldn't message him.

However, the teen later posted a picture on Twitter showing off the shoes. Eldridge posted on a Midwest sneaker Facebook page asking if someone could help him get his shoes back. The page has 35,000 members.

Brad Rogers saw the post in Roseville.

"The phone number was a 586 area code. So I said, 'That's local to us. Let's see what we can do about it,'" he said.

Rogers is big into shoes, too, and big into not giving the metro Detroit sneaker community a bad name. He was able to track down the teen. Rogers went to his house and didn't have to say a word to get the shoes back.

"We didn't even have to, because I messaged him on Facebook, telling him you know it is a felony crime to commit mail fraud. All this can go away if you just give the shoes back. He was like, 'Here you go,'" said Rogers.

The shoes are on the way back to Eldridge, whose faith in selling sneakers to metro Detroit buyers has been restored.

"Yes, a lot. I didn't think it would be possible to get the sneakers back," he said.


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