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House introduces resolution to determine if Reps. Courser, Gamrat are fit for office

The state legislature accused of sleeping with fellow Rep. Todd Courser will finally speak out about the scandal that broke last week.
The state legislature accused of sleeping with fellow Rep. Todd Courser will finally speak out about the scandal that broke last week.


LANSING, Mich. – The Michigan House has introduced a resolution to determine whether or not Reps. Todd Courser and Cindy Gamrat are fit for office.

This is the beginning of the process to potential expulsion hearings, which have only happened once in Michigan history.

You can read the full House Resolution right here.

The two Michigan lawmakers are under fire for an extramarital relationship and fictional email intended to minimize attention. They returned to the Capitol on Tuesday for the first House session since the scandal broke.

Courser, of Lapeer, said he's still in Lansing because "it's my job" and his voice is needed to oppose tax hikes for road repairs.

Read: Rep. Todd Courser posts to Facebook amidst sex scandal, cover-up

"People wanted me to speak about the censure and whether or not that's going to be moving forward," Courser said. "I think it's a little premature to make a statement on that. I'm working on it, in regards to how that will look and feel as we go forward."

Courser said last week that he was the victim of a blackmailing scheme and won't resign after having an email sent to his Republican supporters falsely claiming he had been caught having sex with a male prostitute.

Expulsion requires hearings and a two-thirds majority of House members to vote another member out. The only instance in which this happened was to State Senator David Jaye, a Macomb County Republican.

Attorney Rob Huth served as Jaye's legal counsel and said the writing is on the wall for expulsion hearings for Courser and Gamrat.

Amid the scandal, members of the State House and Senate resumed committee meetings Wednesday in hopes of reaching a compromise on the Michigan roads deal. The plan floating around Lansing calls for a five-cent per gallon gas tax increase, which would raise $600 million. An additional $600 million would come from budget cuts, with the goal of bringing in about $1.2 billion for roads.

Stay tuned for updates to this story throughout the night.