39ºF

Health and safety reports released on 4 Detroit schools; more inspection reports released

DETROIT – The city of Detroit released environmental health and safety field investigation reports on the conditions of four schools and another 14 safety inspection reports detailing the deplorable conditions and the necessary repairs to remain operational.

VIEW ALL INSPECTION REPORTS HERE

The inspection at Dossin Elementary assessed the environmental quality and found stained ceiling tiles indicating a possible roof leak, standing water in a hallway causing floor damage, a need for further plumbing inspections, possible mold growth on damaged interior walls, unavailable hot water in portable buildings, and several broken restroom features.

  • Dossin Elementary Health and Safety Field Investigation Report (view report here)

The inspection at Osborn High School found several broken windows throughout the school, a chair being used to lock a broken door which is considered a fire hazard, a missing fire extinguisher, flooring under drinking fountains to be in disrepair, burnt out light bulbs in various parts of the building, and missing and stained ceiling tiles indicating a possible roof leak and mold infestation.

  • Osborn High School Health and Safety Field Investigation Report (view report here)

The inspection at Ronald Brown Academy found rodent holes and fecal matter, dust and debris in ceiling vents, stained ceiling tiles indicating a possible roof leak, and several water fountains in disrepair.

  • Ronald Brown Academy Health and Safety Field Investigation Report (view report here)

The inspection at Spain Elementary found assessed environmental and air quality finding mold growing under wood flooring in the gym and evidence of a vermin infestation which includes fecal matter and carcasses in various rooms.

  • Spain Elementary Health and Safety Field Investigation Report (view report here)

The Health and Safety Department's reports made recommendations and set time limits as to when these fixes need to me made. Many of the serious findings need to be repaired within 72 hours, while minor infractions need to be repaired within a month. Failure to conduct the proper repairs will result in a recommendation of facility closure and the revocation of Certificate of Occupancy from the Health Department.

The inspections began after teacher sick-outs prompted reaction from the city and gained national attention.

Michelle Zdrodowski, spokeswoman for the district, released the following statement Saturday:

"The issue of the disrepair of some of the District's buildings and a plan to address that is before the legislature. The investment of these funds will be necessary to implement a badly needed, district-wide long-term capital improvement plan. Meanwhile, we continue to address those matters that have been presented in the inspection reports from the city, and have been made aware of through our work order system, through a corrective action plan that provides available resources for these repairs. We are committed to ensuring that our students and staff have a safe working and learning environment, and that is a part of the discussion regarding the critical financial investment into the new Detroit Public School System that is before the Michigan legislature."

Mayor Mike Duggan said if DPS fails to respond, then the city of Detroit will take legal action.

"We are giving school officials a reasonable timeline to correct the deficiencies and we hope they will," Duggan said in a statement. "But if they don't, we are going to take prompt legal action to enforce compliance."