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LIVE STREAM: President Trump to make statement following Asia trip (11/15/17)

President Trump returned from week-long Asia trip

U.S. President Donald Trump and China's President Xi Jinping arrive at a state dinner at the Great Hall of the People on November 9, 2017 in Beijing, China.
U.S. President Donald Trump and China's President Xi Jinping arrive at a state dinner at the Great Hall of the People on November 9, 2017 in Beijing, China. (Thomas Peter/2017 Getty Images)

WASHINGTON – Pres. Trump expected to speak from the White House this afternoon; topics of discussion likely to include a review of his Asia trip.

The statement is scheduled for 3:30 p.m. ET from Washington D.C. - You can watch it LIVE here on ClickOnDetroit.

Back from Asia, Trump resumes morning tweets and slams media

Just back from Asia, President Donald Trump has resumed his morning tweeting routine — this time citing what he’s calling a “successful” trip and slamming a regular media target.

The president arrived back at the White House on Tuesday evening after a 12-day tour of Asia, and the tweeting picked up hours later.

He says the United States is “respected again” in the Asia-Pacific region, and he asserts that people “will see the fruits of our long but successful trip for many years to come!”

Trump also is back sparring at CNN, one of his favorite media targets.

The president tweeted Wednesday that he was “forced” to watch CNN during the trip and “again realized how bad, and FAKE, it is.”

Trump also tweeted criticism at The New York Times. He says the paper “hates” that he has good relationships with world leaders and “they should realize that these relationships are a good thing, not a bad thing.” He called the paper “naive (or dumb)” on foreign policy.

Trump in Asia: A break from the past but uncertain results

President Donald Trump declared his first Asian tour “tremendously successful” as he hopped on a plane bound for Washington. But when he landed at the White House late Tuesday he arrived with few concrete accomplishments in hand.

As he jetted across the region, to five nations, six cities and three summits over 12 days, Trump pushed regional leaders to reshape trade deals to America’s liking, but he won no firm commitments from his hosts. He opened the door to negotiations with North Korea, but then seemed to shut it again by deriding the dictator Kim Jong Un as “short and fat.”

He did not try to push leaders to end human rights abuses.

Trump has said he’ll have more to say about the trip’s achievements in a “major statement” at the White House this week. The White House would not discuss the details in advance.

The trip did reveal much about Trump’s traveling style. He soaked up the pageantry and was well practiced at the art of flattery.

For all his tough campaign talk on trade, Trump appeared reluctant to take a confrontational stance. He cajoled and flattered leaders in Tokyo and Seoul without eliciting firm commitments for a more balanced economic relationship. At a summit in Vietnam, he vowed to hold rising superpower China accountable for unfair business and trade practices. Yet in Beijing, the president said, “I don’t blame China” for a growing trade gap.