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LIVE STREAM: DHS Sec. Kirstjen Nielsen testifies in House hearing

House Homeland Security Committee holds hearing Wednesday

Homeland Security Secretary Kirstjen Nielsen testifies in front of the Senate Select Committee on Intelligence on March 21, 2018. (WDIV)
Homeland Security Secretary Kirstjen Nielsen testifies in front of the Senate Select Committee on Intelligence on March 21, 2018. (WDIV)

WASHINGTON – House Homeland Security Committee will hold a hearing to examine, "The Way Forward on Border Security," with testimony from Secretary of Homeland Security Kirstjen Nielsen.

Watch the hearing live at 10 a.m. on ClickOnDetroit.

Homeland Security secretary to face Democrat-controlled House committee

(CNN) - Homeland Security Secretary Kirstjen Nielsen on Wednesday will become the highest Trump administration official yet this year to testify on the administration's immigration policies.

Nielsen, who assumed the post in December 2017, is appearing before the House Homeland Security Committee for a hearing on border security, which encompasses President Donald Trump's national emergency declaration, the border wall and the administration's "zero tolerance" immigration policy, which resulted in thousands of migrant children being separated from their undocumented parents.

It's expected to be contentious, as Democratic lawmakers could hammer the secretary over the controversial policies and denounce the President's declaration, which they've already voted to terminate in a resolution that's now being considered by the Senate.

On all those fronts, Nielsen's responses will be illuminating, particularly after months of speculation that the secretary would step down or be fired. Last year, Trump lashed out at Nielsen as border apprehensions increased, but eventually he warmed to her.

Nielsen is at the core of the heated debate over Trump's signature border wall, which led to the longest government shutdown in US history earlier this year and, most recently, the national emergency declaration. Nielsen has defended the President's declaration and will likely draw on recent data to back up the need for additional resources.