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General Motors to make face masks for frontline workers amid coronavirus pandemic

GM expects to be able to produce 50,000 masks a day

General Motors ramps up to begin manufacturing Level 1 face masks Wednesday, March 25, 2020, at its Warren, Michigan manufacturing facility. Production will begin next week and within two weeks ramp up to 50,000 masks per day, with the potential to increase to 100,000 per day.. (Photo by John F. Martin for General Motors)
General Motors ramps up to begin manufacturing Level 1 face masks Wednesday, March 25, 2020, at its Warren, Michigan manufacturing facility. Production will begin next week and within two weeks ramp up to 50,000 masks per day, with the potential to increase to 100,000 per day.. (Photo by John F. Martin for General Motors) (© 2020 John F. Martin and General Motors. This image is protected by copyright but provided for editorial and social media use. The use of this image for advertising, marketing, or any other commercial purposes is prohibited.)

DETROIT – General Motors announced that it is going to be making face masks for frontline workers amid the coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic.

Many frontline workers are facing a critical shortage of face masks. GM launched a rapid-response project to produce masks at scale on March 20. Seven days later the team had produced their first sample on the production line.

GM expects to deliver 20,000 masks by next week and estimates it will produce an estimated 1.5 million masks a month when it reaches full capacity.

General Motors ramps up to begin manufacturing Level 1 face masks Wednesday, March 25, 2020, at its Warren, Michigan manufacturing facility. Production will begin next week and within two weeks ramp up to 50,000 masks per day, with the potential to increase to 100,000 per day.. (Photo by John F. Martin for General Motors)
General Motors ramps up to begin manufacturing Level 1 face masks Wednesday, March 25, 2020, at its Warren, Michigan manufacturing facility. Production will begin next week and within two weeks ramp up to 50,000 masks per day, with the potential to increase to 100,000 per day.. (Photo by John F. Martin for General Motors) (© 2020 John F. Martin and General Motors. This image is protected by copyright but provided for editorial and social media use. The use of this image for advertising, marketing, or any other commercial purposes is prohibited.)

“Our team began looking at ways we could quickly utilize our talents and resources to help in the shared fight against COVID-19,” said Peter Thom, GM vice president, Global Manufacturing Engineering. “Working around the clock, our team rallied with incredible passion and focus to come up with a plan to produce masks that will help protect the women and men on the front lines of this crisis.”

The core team assembled for the first time on March 20.

“Because we wanted to move fast, the team set an incredibly aggressive goal: To have the production line up and running tests within a week,” said Thom.

More than 30 engineers, designers, buyers and members of the manufacturing team were asked to help with product development, sourcing materials and equipment, and planning the production process.

“The first people we called were those who work with fabric vehicle components,” said Karsten Garbe, GM plant director, Global Pre-Production Operations. “In a few days, the company’s seat belt and interior trim experts became experts in manufacturing face masks.”

Work began at the Warren facility. The team cleared 31,000 square feet to accommodate the mask production lines. Crews installed new electrical service lines to power production equipment and assembly stations.

After everything was set up the team worked to test each step in the production process.

At 2:30 p.m. on March 27, the project team had their first production-made mask in their hands.

“Not only did the team make their goal, but they over-delivered,” said Thom. “They actually beat our deadline, running the first mask through the equipment 30 minutes ahead of target. We’re excited because this means we’re even closer to being able to protect the healthcare teams who are working tirelessly to save lives.”

By Monday, March 30, more than 2,000 masks were produced by teams working through the weekend. Once quality measures are completed, the team expects to start producing masks for delivery early next week.

GM and the UAW will seek more than two dozen paid volunteers from Detroit-area plants to staff mask operations.

The team expects to have 20,000 masks ready for delivery on April 8. Once the line is running at full speed, it will be able to produce up to 50,000 masks every day – or up to 1.5 million masks a month.

General Motors ramps up to begin manufacturing Level 1 face masks Wednesday, March 25, 2020, at its Warren, Michigan manufacturing facility. Production will begin next week and within two weeks ramp up to 50,000 masks per day, with the potential to increase to 100,000 per day.. (Photo by John F. Martin for General Motors)
General Motors ramps up to begin manufacturing Level 1 face masks Wednesday, March 25, 2020, at its Warren, Michigan manufacturing facility. Production will begin next week and within two weeks ramp up to 50,000 masks per day, with the potential to increase to 100,000 per day.. (Photo by John F. Martin for General Motors) (© 2020 John F. Martin and General Motors. This image is protected by copyright but provided for editorial and social media use. The use of this image for advertising, marketing, or any other commercial purposes is prohibited.)

MORE: What the CDC says you should do if you believe you have coronavirus (COVID-19)

How COVID-19 Spreads

Person-to-person spread

The virus is thought to spread mainly from person-to-person.

  • Between people who are in close contact with one another (within about 6 feet).
  • Through respiratory droplets produced when an infected person coughs or sneezes.

These droplets can land in the mouths or noses of people who are nearby or possibly be inhaled into the lungs.

Can someone spread the virus without being sick?

  • Spread is possible before people show symptoms. People who are not showing symptoms can still be carrying the virus and can still pass it on to other people.

Spread from contact with contaminated surfaces or objects

It may be possible that a person can get COVID-19 by touching a surface or object that has the virus on it and then touching their own mouth, nose, or possibly their eyes, but this is not thought to be the main way the virus spreads.

How easily the virus spreads

How easily a virus spreads from person-to-person can vary. Some viruses are highly contagious (spread easily), like measles, while other viruses do not spread as easily. Another factor is whether the spread is sustained, spreading continually without stopping.

Prevention & Treatment

There is currently no vaccine to prevent coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). The best way to prevent illness is to avoid being exposed to this virus. However, as a reminder, CDC always recommends everyday preventive actions to help prevent the spread of respiratory diseases, including:

  • Avoid close contact with people who are sick.
  • Avoid touching your eyes, nose, and mouth.
  • Stay home when you are sick.
  • Cover your cough or sneeze with a tissue, then throw the tissue in the trash.
  • Clean and disinfect frequently touched objects and surfaces using a regular household cleaning spray or wipe.

Wash your hands often with soap and water for at least 20 seconds, especially after going to the bathroom; before eating; and after blowing your nose, coughing, or sneezing.

Click here for more guidelines from the CDC.

People who think they may have been exposed to COVID-19 should contact their healthcare provider immediately.

Question about coronavirus? Ask Dr. McGeorge here.

Read more about coronavirus here.


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