Michigan AG returns fire on Trump: ‘You’re not our type’

President Trump takes to Twitter to criticize Michigan AG Dana Nessel

Michigan Attorney General Dana Nessel addresses the media during a news conference, Thursday, March 5, 2020, in Lansing, Mich. (Matthew Dae Smith/Lansing State Journal via AP)
Michigan Attorney General Dana Nessel addresses the media during a news conference, Thursday, March 5, 2020, in Lansing, Mich. (Matthew Dae Smith/Lansing State Journal via AP)

President Donald Trump has once again taken aim at Michigan Attorney General Dana Nessel on Twitter early Sunday morning -- and she was not having it.

Early on Dec. 27, Trump tweeted that he disapproved of Nessel’s move to sanction the GOP attorneys who pushed falsehoods in court while backing the president’s attempt to overturn the results of the 2020 election. Trump said the lawyers who may be facing sanctions are “true patriots who are fighting for the truth” and that, instead, Nessel “should be sanctioned.”

Read: GOP attorneys could face sanctions over falsehoods pressed in Michigan election lawsuits

Nessel fired back at Trump Sunday morning, calling him selfish and alluding that he, himself, is not a patriot.

“A patriot is a person who vigorously defends their country against its enemies and detractors. History will reveal which you were. I wish you loved your country half as much as you love yourself,” reads Nessel’s tweet. “Also, time to stop obsessing about those women from Michigan. You’re not our type.”

Nessel followed up with another tweet Sunday, saying she doesn’t expect this behavior from President-elect Joe Biden come his inauguration in January.

“Can’t a random state AG from the Midwest sleep in on a Sunday morning without waking up to find that the President of the United States has mean-tweeted about you overnight (again)? The answer is “yes” come January 20th,” Nessel tweeted.

The president’s criticism comes days after officials began calling to disbar the GOP attorneys involved in 2020 election lawsuits, including those in Michigan, or to at least ban them from courtrooms.

Last week, Nessel said her office, along with Secretary of State Jocelyn Benson, will likely file sanctions of their own to get attorneys such as close Trump ally Sidney Powell banned from state courtrooms.

“These are flagrant lies that Ms. Powell is submitting it to of all places the United States Supreme Court of all places in some cases. It’s disturbing and it undermines our entire profession, and she has to be held accountable,” Nessel said in an interview Tuesday. “We’d be asking there be action taken against her law license including potentially disbarment.”

In one of the latest filings, the attorney for Wayne County, Robert Davis, called on the federal judge in Michigan’s Eastern District to sanction the lawyers for six Michigan Trump supporters who are suing Gov. Gretchen Whitmer in an attempt to overturn the presidential election results. According to the motion, Davis said the attorneys violated codes of conduct by repeating falsehoods in court, at one point calling the suit “a deliberate and mean-spirited effort to undermine the will of the more than 5.5 million people.”

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Trump, House lawmakers plot futile effort to block Biden win (AP)

President Donald Trump hosted several House Republican lawmakers at the White House on Monday, Dec. 21 to discuss an ultimately futile effort to block Congress from affirming President-elect Joe Biden’s victory in the November election.

The meeting underscored Trump’s refusal to accept the reality of his loss and his willingness to entertain undemocratic efforts to overturn the will of the majority of American voters. Biden will be sworn in as president on Jan. 20.

With no credible legal options remaining and the Electoral College having confirmed Biden’s victory earlier this month, Trump is turning his attention to Jan. 6. That’s when Congress participates in a count of the electoral votes, which Biden won 306-232.

The count, required by the Constitution, is generally a formality. But members can use the event to object to a state’s votes.

Read the full story here.


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