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Report: Michigan's Jabrill Peppers tested positive for diluted sample at NFL combine

Peppers expected to be drafted late in first round this week

DETROIT – Former Michigan star Jabrill Peppers failed a drug test at the NFL Scouting Combine earlier this offseason due to a diluted sample, ESPN's Adam Schefter reports.

ESPN's Adam Schefter reports the Michigan Wolverines star tested positive for the diluted sample at the NFL Combine last month.

ESPN got a statement from the agency that represents Peppers:

"Peppers went to the combine. He was sick after flying there from San Diego. He has a history of cramping. Peppers was being pumped with fluids, drinking 8-10 bottles of water before he went to bed, because he was the first guy to work out two days for the LBs and DBs. He had to go through that first day, come back on second day, and that was the fear. So Peppers was pounding water and under the weather. He never failed a drug test in his life, nor tested positive before for any substance."

According to a CAA spokesman, who works for agency that represents Jabril Peppers: "Peppers went to the combine. He...

Posted by Adam Schefter on Monday, April 24, 2017

Jabrill Peppers perhaps played out of position at Michigan last season, lining up as a linebacker even though he seemed most suited to play safety in the NFL.

He made enough plays to become a Heisman Trophy finalist as a junior and to determine he was ready to play in the league.

Timing might work against Peppers, though, because he's projected to be taken after LSU's Jamal Adams and Ohio State's Malik Hooker. Those two safeties are expected to be among the top selections next week, and no one appears to be sure when Peppers will be taken.

"It's unfortunate that he's coming out in a year where there are so many good safeties," NFL draft consultant and former Dallas Cowboys general manager Gil Brandt said. "Under normal conditions, he'd probably be the No. 1 safety, but the Ohio State and the LSU guys are so good.

"He's a tremendous football player. He finds a way to makes things happen. Even though he only had one interception at Michigan, he finds a way to make a big play, whether it's a sack off a blitz or on a punt return."


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