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Climate change poses threat to future Super Bowls in Miami

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Copyright 2020 The Associated Press. All rights reserved.

Arizona Cardinals running back Kenyan Drake high fives another Huddle for 100 beach clean up crew member at the Historic Virginia Key Beach Park on Tuesday, Jan. 28, 2020, in Miami. Climate change poses a threat to South Florida's way of life, including Miami's customary spot in the NFL's Super Bowl rotation. The game will be played Sunday in Miami for the 11th time, the most of any city. But the sea and temperature are rising, which could eventually make South Florida an unsuitable Super Bowl site. (AP Photo/Brynn Anderson)

MIAMI, Fla. – The forecast for the Super Bowl in Miami is grim.

Clear skies and temperature in the 60s are expected when the game kicks off, so weather won't be a problem.

But climate change likely will be, sooner or later. The sea and temperature are rising, posing a threat to South Floridians' way of life, including their customary spot in the NFL's Super Bowl rotation.

The game will be played Sunday in Miami for the 11th time, the most of any city. Given the changing climate, how much longer will the region be a place where the NFL wants to bring its big party?

“In 10 years maybe we’ll still be functioning normally,” said Harold Wanless, a leading expert on sea level rise in South Florida. “Twenty years? I think that could be a problem.”

The Miami Dolphins' stadium, the site of the Super Bowl this year for the sixth time, stands 10 feet above sea level. That will change, although projections vary widely.

Miami first hosted a Super Bowl 52 years ago. What will Miami be doing 52 years from now?

“We just don’t know how fast the water is going to rise,” said South Miami Mayor Philip Stoddard, who has long been sounding the alarm about climate change.