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Congresswoman Dingell, state and city officials to hold community meeting Thursday on Gelman Plume

Debbie Dingell speaks at the Ford School of Public Policy on April 12, 2017 (Credit: Gerald R. Ford School of Public Policy / University of Michigan)
Debbie Dingell speaks at the Ford School of Public Policy on April 12, 2017 (Credit: Gerald R. Ford School of Public Policy / University of Michigan)

ANN ARBOR – On Thursday evening, a community meeting at the Washtenaw County Learning Resource Center from 6:30 p.m. to 8:30 p.m.

Hear Congresswoman Debbie Dingell (D-MI), Environmental Protection Agency and Michigan Department of Environment, Great Lakes, and Energy officials, the Michigan Attorney General’s Office and local officials including Ann Arbor City Council members, Washtenaw County Commissioners and other stakeholders discuss the Gelman dioxane plume.

Both community members and local elected officials will have the opportunity to ask questions of federal, state and local officials on what action can be taken on the matter.

The Gelman dioxane plume is a toxic pollution that’s gradually spreading through Ann Arbor, contaminating the groundwater. The source of the contamination is Gelman Sciences, Inc., a chemical plant in Scio Township, and the chemical that’s been seeping into the area’s soil and groundwater since the late 1960s is 1,4-dioxane, categorized by the EPA as “a probable human carcinogen.”

City officials and residents have long expressed concern and mulled various actions over the spread, including whether it might be safer to connect to Detroit’s water system.

To learn more about the history of the plume, click here.

The Washtenaw County Learning Resource Center is at 4135 Washtenaw Ave.

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