Where Michigan’s Congressional Delegation stands on independent commission to investigate Jan. 6 insurrection

On Wednesday, the House of Representatives advanced a Bill to start an independent commission to investigate the deadly attack.
On Wednesday, the House of Representatives advanced a Bill to start an independent commission to investigate the deadly attack.

The U.S. National Guard’s deployment in Washington, D.C. comes to an end Monday.

Troops have spent more than four months in D.C., following the Jan. 6 insurrection at the U.S. Capitol Building that left five dead.

More than 2,100 troops will return home during the week. While the security around the U.S. Capitol returns to normal, there is still a debate in Washington over what comes next.

On Wednesday, the House of Representatives advanced a Bill to start an independent commission to investigate the deadly attack.

Most of Michigan’s members of Congress followed party lines, but Michigan’s elected representatives have been at the forefront of the fight to dig deeper into the storming of the U.S. Capitol Building.

All of Michigan’s Democratic elected officials voted for an investigation into the fatal January attack, five GOP members voted against it, including Reps. Lisa McClain, Jack Bergman and Tim Walberg, who also voted to not certify the 2020 U.S. General Election results and to not impeach former President Donald Trump.

Michigan GOP Reps. Fred Upton and Peter Meijer voted for the investigation into the deadly siege.

“Honestly, I was hoping this January 6 Commission could be a chance for us to set what we viewed as partisan politics aside,” Meijer said Sunday.

Rep. Elissa Slotkin, who heads the House Committee on Counter-terrorism, has been pushing for a deeper look at what happened in January modeled after the 9/11 Commission.

“I think that’s sort of the gold standard of what a bipartisan commission looks like, so I’m sad that it became a political football because we need to understand what happened and make sure it never happens again,” Slotkin said.

EXPLAINER: How Congress’ Jan. 6 commission would work

As the fallout of an attack on the U.S. Capitol continues, Slotkin said she still has hope the Commission will happen despite the expected GOP opposition in the Senate.

“I still have hope that the Senate will read the document, and if they voted, some of them have been around since the 9/11 Commission, so if you voted for the 9/11 Commission, it’s hard to vote now against this Commission since it’s a cut and paste situation,” Slotkin said.

After the vote on the Commission passed in the House, Trump promised consequences for Republican lawmakers who voted for the investigation.

RELATED: Michigan Rep. Dan Kildee opens up about PTSD after Jan. 6 insurrection


About the Authors:

Grant comes to Local 4 from Oklahoma City. He joins the news team as co-anchor of Local 4 News Today weekend mornings and is a general assignment reporter.

Dane is a producer and media enthusiast. He previously worked freelance video production and writing jobs in Michigan, Georgia and Massachusetts. Dane graduated from the Specs Howard School of Media Arts.