Gay marriages rise 5 years after Supreme Court ruling

FILE - In this April 28, 2015 file photo, demonstrators stand in front of a rainbow flag of the Supreme Court in Washington. In 2019, there were slightly less than 1 million same-sex couple households in the U.S., and a majority of those couples were married. New figures released Thursday, Sept. 17, 2020 by the U.S. Census Bureau shows that of the 980,000 same-sex couple households, 58% were married couples and 42% were unmarried partners. (AP Photo/Jose Luis Magana, File)
FILE - In this April 28, 2015 file photo, demonstrators stand in front of a rainbow flag of the Supreme Court in Washington. In 2019, there were slightly less than 1 million same-sex couple households in the U.S., and a majority of those couples were married. New figures released Thursday, Sept. 17, 2020 by the U.S. Census Bureau shows that of the 980,000 same-sex couple households, 58% were married couples and 42% were unmarried partners. (AP Photo/Jose Luis Magana, File) (Copyright 2020 The Associated Press. All rights reserved.)

ORLANDO, Fla. – Five years after the U.S. Supreme Court legalized same-sex marriages around the U.S., more than a half million households are made up of married same-sex couples, according to figures the U.S. Census Bureau released Thursday.

Since 2014, the year before the U.S. Supreme Court legalized same sex marriages, the number of married same-sex households has increased by almost 70%, rising to 568,110 couples in 2019, according to the Census Bureau’s American Community Survey.

Of the 980,000 same-sex couple households reported in 2019, 58% were married couples and 42% were unmarried partners, the survey showed.

There were slightly more female couple households than male couple households.

“Opponents of marriage equality frequently argued that same-sex couples really weren’t all that interested in marriage. But the large increase in marriages among same-sex couples since marriage equality became legal nationwide offers evidence of the clear desire for marriage among same-sex couples," said Gary Gates, a demographer specializing in LGBT issues.

The survey revealed noticeable economic differences between male couples and female couples, as well as same-sex couples and opposite-sex couples.

Same-sex married couples had a higher median income than opposite-sex married couples, $107,210 compared to $96,932. In same-sex marriages, though, male couples earned more than female couples, $123,646 versus $87,690.

According to the survey, same-sex married households were more likely to be in the workforce than opposite-sex married households, 84.6% compared to 80.4%.