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Agency says tests of aggregate spill into Detroit River show federal guidelines for drinking water were followed

First round of testing from Nov. 26 collapse at Detroit Bulk Storage detected aluminum, barium, boron and strontium

GF Default - EPA investigating seawall collapse at contaminated site along Detroit River
GF Default - EPA investigating seawall collapse at contaminated site along Detroit River (WDIV)

An agency that supplies water services to Detroit and dozens of other communities says initial water quality tests following the spill of limestone construction aggregate into the Detroit River did not turn up uranium, thorium, mercury or lead.

The Great Lakes Water Authority says results of a first round of testing from the Nov. 26 collapse at Detroit Bulk Storage detected aluminum, barium, boron and strontium, but they occur naturally in the area’s raw water.

It also says all levels detected for those metals were below the established regulatory guidelines for drinking water set by the U.S. Environmental Protect Agency and the state of Michigan.