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Ceremony in Grosse Pointe Farms honors Michiganders who died in 9/11

Dozens gathered at The War Memorial

GROSSE POINTE FARMS, Mich. – A small group gathered Friday morning in Grosse Pointe Farms to pay respect to Michiganders lost in 9/11.

It happened at The War Memorial, a home donated by the Alger family back in the 1940′s. David Alger was a Mutual Fund Manager who died 19 years ago in his office at the World Trace Center.

The War Memorial is a moving setting for the observance, with the veteran’s garden, a large American flag flown at half-staff and Lake St. Clair lapping at the sea wall.

At 8:46 a.m., a bell rang to mark the time the first plane hit the World Trade Center and a moment of silence was observed. A second moment of silence was observed at 9:03 a.m., the same time the second plane struck.

The names were read of the 19 Michiganders who died that day.

“And as a patriotic, cultural community leader, The War Memorial is committed to those moments in time where we can bring people together and to really think about our past as we think about our future," War Memorial President Charles Burke said.

Several dozen attendees sat carefully socially-distanced and hearkened back to a time when the attacks unified a nation.

“The valor and brave actions of all the first line responders is inspirational and eerie at the same time," said Matt Guinta.

“I think 9/11 has been buried this year with the coronavirus and I just needed to be somewhere to remember," said Anita Laurila.

Ceremonies honoring and remembering the nearly 3,000 lives lost in the attack took place across the state.

Detroit Mayor Mike Duggan, DPD Chief James Craig and Executive Fire Commissioner Eric Jones paid respect in Campus Martius.

More information on The War Memorial’s 9/11 Service of Remembrance can be found on its official website here.


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