WHAT TO WATCH: Pence, Conway and protest pushback at RNC

Eric Trump, the son of President Donald Trump, tapes his speech for the second day of the Republican National Convention from the Andrew W. Mellon Auditorium in Washington, Tuesday, Aug. 25, 2020. (AP Photo/Andrew Harnik)
Eric Trump, the son of President Donald Trump, tapes his speech for the second day of the Republican National Convention from the Andrew W. Mellon Auditorium in Washington, Tuesday, Aug. 25, 2020. (AP Photo/Andrew Harnik) (Copyright 2020 The Associated Press. All rights reserved)

LAS VEGAS – Vice President Mike Pence will deliver the marquee speech Wednesday night at the Republican convention, making the case for another four years for President Donald Trump and laying the foundation for his own potential White House run in 2024.

Pence, whose future political aspirations could hinge on November, has campaigned aggressively for the president. He’s likely to continue making a forceful case in his address while touching on cultural divides that been peppered throughout the convention’s program.

What to watch Wednesday night:

PENCE

Pence is delivering the evening’s keynote from Baltimore’s Fort McHenry, where Americans defended Baltimore Harbor from the British in the War of 1812 and inspired Francis Scott Key to write “The Star-Spangled Banner.” Pence, who is expected to speak to a crowd at the national monument, is likely to pay tribute to American symbols like the national anthem and draw a contrast with social justice demonstrators. Pence has helped steer the White House response to the coronavirus, leading a task force and frequently working with the nation’s governors. The GOP convention has mentioned the virus far less than Democrats did last week, but Pence could throw it back into focus if he speaks about the work he’s led.

CONWAY’S EXIT APPEARANCE

Kellyanne Conway, one of the most visible representatives of the Trump administration, will make a convention appearance days before she leaves the White House.

Conway managed Trump’s campaign during the last stretch of the 2016 race, becoming the first woman to successfully steer a White House bid. She then became a senior counselor to the president and made unyielding and occasionally befuddling defenses of Trump in her media appearances, coining the phrase “alternative facts” in one rebuttal.