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Wimbledon 2017: TV schedule, order, how to watch, live results

Everything you need to know about Wimbledon 2017

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LONDON – Roger Federer, Novak Djokovic, Rafael Nadal and Andy Murray have ruled Wimbledon for the past 14 years, combining to win the tournament every time in that span.

No real surprise, given the way that Big 4 dominates the sport of tennis. Still, at some point, that group's run of excellence at the All England Club must end.

It's just hard to find folks who think that'll happen this year, when play at the grass-court major begins Monday?

Somewhere, there is a man who one day will win Wimbledon - and other Grand Slam titles, too.

John McEnroe recalls knowing early on in the careers of players such as Nadal or Djokovic that they would break through. Lately, though, the seven-time major champion said, "I don't see that person right now that's got it all, where you're like, 'OK.'"

McEnroe's brother, Patrick, agreed the most likely winner will again be one of the usual quartet. And he went a step further.

"We're going to be likely talking about two of those four guys on 'championship Sunday,'" said Patrick, who joins John as an ESPN analyst during the fortnight.

Here's what you need to know about Wimbledon 2017:

The full Wimbledon 2017 schedule:

Dates

Qualifying 2017: Monday 26 June - Thursday 29 June

The Championships 2017: Monday 3 July - Sunday 16 July

Daily Schedule

A full Order of Play will be available the night before the next day's play.

Provisional Championships Schedule

The following is a provisional guide to which events are played when during The Championships:

FIRST WEEK

First Monday 

From 11.30am on outside courts, 1pm on Centre and No.1 Court

Gentlemen's Singles first round
Ladies' Singles first round

First Tuesday

From 11.30am on outside courts, 1pm on Centre and No.1 Court

Gentlemen's Singles first round
Ladies' Singles first round

First Wednesday

From 11.30am on outside courts, 1pm on Centre and No.1 Court

Gentlemen's Singles second round
Ladies' Singles second round
Gentlemen's Doubles first round
Ladies' Doubles first round

First Thursday

From 11.30am on outside courts, 1pm on Centre and No.1 Court

Gentlemen's Singles second round
Ladies' Singles second round
Gentlemen's Doubles first round
Ladies' Doubles first round

First Friday

From 11.30am on outside courts, 1pm on Centre and No.1 Court

Gentlemen's Singles third round
Ladies' Singles third round
Gentlemen's Doubles second round
Ladies' Doubles second round

Middle Saturday

Juniors from 11am on outside courts, all other main draw matches from 11.30am, 1pm on Centre and No.1 Courts.

Gentlemen's Singles third round
Ladies' Singles third round
Gentlemen's Doubles second round
Ladies' Doubles second round
Mixed Doubles first round
Boys' and Girls' singles first round 

Middle Sunday
No play

SECOND WEEK

Second Monday

Juniors from 11am on outside courts, all other main draw matches from 11.30am, 1pm on Centre and No.1 Courts.

Gentlemen's Singles fourth round
Ladies' Singles fourth round
Gentlemen's Doubles third round
Ladies' Doubles third round
Mixed Doubles first round
Boys' and Girls' Singles first round 

Second Tuesday

Juniors from 11am on outside courts, all other main draw matches from 11.30am, 1pm on Centre and No.1 Courts.

Ladies' Singles quarter-finals
Gentlemen's Doubles quarter-finals
Ladies' Doubles quarter-finals
Mixed Doubles second round
Boys' and Girls' Singles second round
Boys' and Girls' Doubles first round

Second Wednesday

Juniors from 11am on outside courts, all other main draw matches from 11.30am, 1pm on Centre and No.1 Courts.

Gentlemen's Singles quarter-finals
Ladies' Doubles semi-finals
Mixed Doubles second round
Boys' and Girls' Singles third round
Boys' and Girls' Doubles second round
Invitation Doubles

Second Thursday

Juniors from 11am on outside courts, all other main draw matches from 11.30am, 1pm on Centre and No.1 Courts.

Ladies' Singles semi-finals
Gentlemen's Doubles semi-finals
Mixed Doubles third round
Wheelchair Gentlemen's and Ladies' Singles quarter-finals
Boys' and Girls' Singles quarter-finals
Boys' and Girls' Doubles third round
Invitation Doubles 

Second Friday

Juniors from 11am on outside courts, all other main draw matches from 11.30am, 1pm on Centre and No.1 Courts.

Gentlemen's Singles semi-finals
Gentlemen's Doubles semi-finals
Mixed Doubles quarter-finals
Wheelchair Gentlemen's and Ladies' Singles semi-finals
Wheelchair Gentlemen's and Ladies' Doubles semi-finals
Boys' and Girls' Singles semi-finals
Boys' and Girls' Doubles quarter-finals
Invitation Doubles 

Second Saturday

Juniors from 11am on outside courts, all other main draw matches from 11.30am, 1pm on Centre and No.1 Courts.

2pm - Ladies' Singles final

Gentlemen's Doubles final
Ladies' Doubles final
Girls' Singles final
Wheelchair Ladies' Singles final
Wheelchair Gentlemen's Doubles final
Mixed Doubles semi-finals
Boys' and Girls' Doubles semi-finals 
Invitation Doubles 

Second Sunday

Juniors from 11am on outside courts, all other main draw matches from 11.30am, 2pm on Centre and No.1 Courts.

2pm - Gentlemen's Singles final

Mixed Doubles final
Wheelchair Gentlemen's Singles final
Wheelchair Ladies' Doubles final
Boys' Singles final
Boys' Doubles final
Girls' Doubles final
Invitation Doubles finals

 

TV SCHEDULE FOR WIMBLEDON:

 WATCH in the U.S. - ESPN

If someone else is going to take home the title, here is a look at some candidates:

STAN WAWRINKA, 32, SWITZERLAND

Why he could do it: He's won each of the other three major tournaments, so knows how to grind through seven best-of-five-set matches. He also owns a superb one-handed backhand that can control a match.

Why he might not: He's never had much success at Wimbledon, going 18-12 with two quarterfinal appearances. His footwork on grass needs help; he could go to the net more.

What a championship would mean: Completing a career Grand Slam, something only eight other men have done (including Federer, Djokovic and Nadal).

ALEXANDER ZVEREV, 20, GERMANY

Why he should be taken seriously: He is 6-foot-6 (1.98 meters), with big shots and tennis smarts. He recently beat Djokovic in the Italian Open final to become the youngest champion at a Masters event since - wait for it - Djokovic.

Why it's too soon to take him seriously: He's only 20, and never been past the third round at a major. Here is how John McEnroe put it: "I'm pretty sure he's going to win multiple majors. He's about as close to (that) guy as I get. But ... he's a little frail."

What a championship would mean: The true arrival of a member of the next generation.

MILOS RAONIC, 26, CANADA

Why last year should not be considered a fluke: His first run to a Grand Slam final, before losing to Murray, was not his only success at a major. He also reached the 2014 Wimbledon semifinals, and the 2016 Australian Open semifinals, and his serve is among the game's best.

Why last year might have been a fluke: His semifinal victory over Federer lost a little luster because of Federer's surgically repaired left knee. More cause for concern is that Raonic has shown little inclination to take another step forward over the past year.

What a championship would mean: It would be a first for Canada, but more importantly, it could signal that Raonic is ready to really flourish and unveil the promise he's long shown.

NICK KYRGIOS, 22, AUSTRALIA

Why fans and foes should keep an eye on him: He's got as stylish and entertaining a brand of tennis as there is nowadays, full of big serves and forehands, trick shots, athleticism and more. He is capable of beating Nadal - as he already has at Wimbledon - or Federer or anyone, really, when he puts his mind to it.

Why it's OK to look away: He can lose his way suddenly in the course of a match, leaving fans frustrated.

What a championship would mean: A bright new face, a bold character, a brash champion, all rolled into one. He's young and charismatic and could rule the sport if he is able to pull together his game - and his mindset.

MARIN CILIC, 28, CROATIA

Why he should be included in the conversation: Like Wawrinka, he's an older member of this group who already knows what it takes to win a major (2014 U.S. Open). Unlike Wawrinka, he seems to have a style suited to grass.

Why perhaps he shouldn't: He's never been past the quarterfinals at Wimbledon, losing at that stage each of the last three years.

What a championship would mean: A second major and validation as no one-hit wonder.

STILL WITHOUT FULL STRENGTH, KVITOVA FAVORED

Petra Kvitova still has not regained full strength in her left hand, the one she uses to swing a tennis racket so well that she won Wimbledon twice - and the one that was stabbed by an intruder at her home in the Czech Republic late last year.

Just seven months after that attack, Kvitova somehow carries the status of the closest thing to a favorite at the All England Club, where play in the grass-court Grand Slam tournament begins Monday.

Not that she's all that concerned, understandably, with others' thoughts about whether she can add to the trophies she clutched at Wimbledon in 2011 and 2014 .

"I don't see it like that," Kvitova said in an email to The Associated Press.

"I am just happy to be back on the court and that's it," she said. "I will be focusing on myself and not thinking any further than my first match."

Simply competing these days is an accomplishment in itself for someone who initially was told there was a possibility it might never happen again. All five fingers on her left hand were injured in the late December knifing, and she needed surgery.

"There was definitely doubt in my mind that I would ever be able to play again, because that's what some of the doctors were saying," Kvitova said. "But the more I heard people doubting if I could come back, the more it motivated me. I wanted to prove people wrong and I love challenges, so I think that's what kept me going through the recovery process."

The 27-year-old Kvitova, who has been ranked as high as No. 2 and is seeded 11th at Wimbledon, only began practicing a couple of weeks before the French Open started in May. She made a last-minute decision to enter the clay-court major and wound up winning her opening match, then losing her next.

In her comeback's second tournament, last week on grass at Birmingham, England, Kvitova earned the title, beating Ashleigh Barty 4-6, 6-3, 6-2 in the final with the help of 13 aces.

That total, to Kvitova, was a sign that she is getting closer to the player who succeeds on grass on the strength of a strong serve and powerful forehands.

She pulled out of this week's tuneup tournament at Eastbourne, England, citing an abdominal injury, but that didn't stop British bookmakers from considering her among the likeliest to win Wimbledon: William Hill, for example, listed Kvitova as the favorite.

"I'm surprised at how well I'm playing, for sure," Kvitova said. "It's (a) very nice surprise. ... I wasn't sure if I would have the strength in my grip to hit as hard as before, but I showed in Birmingham that my serve is there and so is my forehand. Hopefully it will keep getting better as my fingers get stronger."

Serena Williams is sitting out the rest of the season while pregnant, and Maria Sharapova is skipping Wimbledon because of an injured left thigh, so there are only two past champions in the field: Kvitova and Williams' sister, five-time winner Venus.

Chris Evert, an 18-time major champion, thinks Kvitova could emerge from what's considered a wide-open draw.

"Seeing that there are not too many, if any, grass-court specialists in the tournament, she is the one that I think everybody has to look out for," said Evert, who will call matches for ESPN. "I think that was such a scare that she went through, it's made her just appreciate the game a lot more. She's certainly more relaxed. You can tell by her press conferences, the way she speaks, she's just happy to be out there. That's just freeing her up to play her best tennis."

The quality of her tennis has pleased Kvitova, to be sure.

More pleasing: The way she's been welcomed back to the tour.

"One of the nicest things has been the reaction of the other players . I have had a lot of players coming up to say hi to me and give me a hug," Kvitova said. "I got a lot of messages when I won in Birmingham, and I heard a lot of players were very emotional in the locker room when I played my first match in Paris. So it's been great to see everyone again and feel that positive energy from my colleagues."

THE LATEST RESULTS FROM WIMBLEDON 2017:


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