Colder Sunday evening, flakes far north for now

Temps in the 20s

Sunday night will be cold and cloudy throughout the area.

DETROIT – Welcome to Sunday evening, Motown.

After a beautiful sunset, skies remain fair as the mercury descends within thermometers across all of Southeast Michigan. Some snowflakes fall well north of Detroit at dinnertime. It becomes cloudier and colder overnight. There is a better chance of snow showers tomorrow.

Sunday evening will have scattered flurries as it becomes colder. Temperatures will be in the 20s.

There is a chance of a few snowflakes here and there, mainly near and north of I-69. Accumulations, if any, will be minor. There will be no need to cancel any plans. In fact, it’ll make winter activities more festive.

Sunday night will be cold and mostly cloudy. Overnight lows will be in the middle and upper teens.

Monday will be mostly cloudy with an area of low pressure arriving. This will be the cause of more widespread scattered snow showers. Highs will be near 30°F. Little accumulation is expected, again.

Tuesday will be sunny and cold. Afternoon temperatures will be in the upper 20s.

Clouds return, Wednesday, with the highest temps of the week. We’ll still need our coats with highs in the middle 30s.

Thursday and Friday will be chilly. The possibility of scatter stir showers returns as high temperatures each day reach the lower middle 30s.

Saturday will be a little colder. Daytime temperatures will be in the upper 20s.

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About the Author:

Andrew Humphrey is an Emmy Award winning meteorologist, and also an AMS Certified Broadcast Meteorologist (CBM). He has a BSE in Meteorology from the University of Michigan and an MS in Meteorology from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, where he wrote his thesis on "The Behavior of the Total Mass of the Atmosphere."