U of M Museum of Natural History reveals upcoming schedule for planetarium, spring break, tours

Museum will be open for spring break

The University of Michigan Museum of Natural History. (U-M Museum of Natural History)

ANN ARBOR, Mich. – The University of Michigan Museum of Natural History revealed its upcoming schedule for spring break, the planetarium and tours.

Spring break

The museum will be open for spring break, which is March 28 to April 1.

It will have an expanded planetarium schedule at this time.

Click here to check up on the most up-to-date information.

Scientist spotlight

University of Michigan scientists will be at the museum from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. March 13 to visit and participate in interactive activities. The event is free and open to the public.

The scientists represent a variety of fields and are part of the museum’s Science Communication Fellows program.

The scientist spotlight will also feature science projects by Forsythe Middle School students.

The event is suitable for upper elementary to adult audiences. Masks are required and social distancing measures will be in place.

Public tours

Free tours are about 30 minutes long and limited to 15 people per group.

You can sign up for a tour at the welcome desk. Visitors of all ages are welcome, and times subject to change.

Museum highlights tour

Visitors can learn about some of the museum’s most exciting exhibits and galleries during a highlights tour. That includes the Exploring Michigan gallery and Evolution: Life Through Time.

Tours are held from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. Saturdays and Sundays.

Planetarium and dome theater

The planetarium and dome theater at the museum takes visitors bask in time from the comfort of reclining seats.

Tickets cost $8 and are available the days of shows at the museum store.

The planetarium is operating at less than 50% capacity to maximize social distancing. As with all University of Michigan buildings, masks are required.

Weekends

Here’s the museum schedule for Fridays, Saturdays and Sundays:

  • 11:30 a.m.: Did an asteroid really kill the dinosaurs?
    • Did a space rock six miles wide slam into the Earth 66 million years ago and wipe out 75% of all living species at that time, including the dinosaurs?
  • 12:30 p.m.: Sky tonight
    • A live presentation on what to find in the sky tonight and in the coming weeks.
  • 1:30 p.m.: Big Astronomy
    • Big Astronomy focuses on three of Earth’s largest observatories in Chile’s rugged Andes Mountains and arid Atacama Desert.
  • 2:30 p.m.: Sky tonight
    • A live presentation on what to find in the sky tonight and in the coming weeks.
The University of Michigan Museum of Natural History. (U-M Museum of Natural History)

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