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Why you're seeing so many spiders in Michigan right now

Wolf spider.

If you've noticed an increase in spiders lately, perhaps wrapping your porch up in web, there's a reason.

No, spiders have not increased in population, and no, they aren't plotting your demise. It's just that time of the year -- it's spider season!

Spiders are most visible in late summer and early fall when males come out to mate. So, they're busy trying to date, which means they're probably too busy to crawl into your bed. That's good news!

Related: Michigan house centipedes: Why you shouldn't kill them

Here's a little more info from Terminix:

You may encounter some house spiders in late summer and early fall that have migrated into your home, but they are not necessarily outdoor migrants seeking a place to stay warm during the winter.

Most spiders' breeding seasons coincide with the transition from summer to fall. If you see more spiders than usual around your home during these months, chances are they're mature males wandering far and wide in search of a mate.

In fact, less than 5 percent of the spiders you encounter inside your home have set one of their eight feet outside, according to Rod Crawford, Curator of Arachnids at the Burke Museum at the University of Washington.

What happens to spiders in the winter?

More from Terminix:

Unlike humans, spiders are considered cold-blooded creatures since they don’t have a mechanism to regulate body temperature. When it's cold, some spider species go through a process of cold-hardening to survive the winter.

Beyond the chemical transformation in their bodies, many spiders seek shelter in piles of rocks, leaves or wood. Once snuggled up, spiders enter a slowdown state called diapause. In diapause, spiders are not completely inactive. Instead, they may emerge on warmer days to hunt and feed on any insect prey that may be active during this time.