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2 Michigan Native American tribes awarded $880,000 from HUD for housing development

The U.S. Department of Housing and Development awarded $880,000 to two Native American tribes in Michigan to improve housing conditions stimulate economic development.
The U.S. Department of Housing and Development awarded $880,000 to two Native American tribes in Michigan to improve housing conditions stimulate economic development.

The U.S. Department of Housing and Development awarded $880,000 Thursday to two Native American tribes in Michigan to improve housing conditions stimulate economic development.

The awards are part of HUD’s Indian Community Development Block Grant Program, a national competitive program that supports community development and affordable housing activities, from new housing to community amenities such as recreation centers and water lines.

“These grants will support our Native American communities as they work to improve housing conditions and neighborhoods,” said HUD Secretary Ben Carson. “HUD will continue to be a steadfast partner to tribes as they design and execute their community development plans.”

The Hannahville Indian Community Tribe will be awarded an ICDBG of $600,000 for the construction of a Youth Services Building. It will expand an after school and summer academic program, a youth employment program as well as an Aquaponic and greenhouse project operated by the youth, and several recreational and sports programs.

The added 4,300 square feet will provide five additional classrooms and restroom facilities to ensure code capacity compliance and continue to allow services to tribal youth seven days a week, HUD said.

The Pokagon Band of Potawatomi Tribe will be awarded an ICDBG of $280,000 to fund construction of waterlines to a project to include new lines and fire mains, as well as closing and restoring an old well system in this area.

The waterline will also provide new and efficient service to the area known as the Rodgers Lake Campus, where a new Health and Wellness Center, Language and Cultural Center, a Head Start Center and a Social Services building are located, HUD said. The project will primarily serve the Head Start Building and the Social Services campus by providing the required number of fire hydrants and water pressure, as well as potable drinking water.

HUD said the ICDBG program was established in 1977 to help Indian tribes and Alaska Native villages meet their community development needs, including decent housing, healthy living environments, and economic opportunities.

Federally recognized Indian tribes, bands, groups or nations, including Alaska Indian, Aleuts and Eskimos, Alaska Native villages and eligible tribal organizations can compete for this funding. The grant awardees can use the funding to build new housing, fix existing housing, buy land for housing or for infrastructure projects, HUD said.

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