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Lawsuit alleges unconstitutional parking fines in Detroit

A parking ticket costs $45 in the city of Detroit and a lawsuit alleges these fines are unconstitutional. (WDIV)
A parking ticket costs $45 in the city of Detroit and a lawsuit alleges these fines are unconstitutional. (WDIV)

DETROIT – Parking fines in Detroit jumped to $45 in 2014 and the discounted grace period was disbanded.

A class action lawsuit filed last week alleges the city’s parking enforcement strategy is unconstitutional.

The suit was filed against the city of Detroit, several officials, and Duncan Solutions, Inc, the largest private for-profit municipal meter parking system contractor in the U.S.

According to the suit filed in federal court, parking fines are assessed at rates higher than those allowed by the city ordinance. Late fine schedules were supposed to include a $10 early payment discount on assessments paid within 10 days of the violation, but was never enacted.

The suit calls the parking enforcement scheme as unconstitutional because it violates “substantive and procedural due process” and the right to be free of excessive fines.

The plaintiffs in the case are Kayla Friess, 25, of Detroit and Issa Haddad, 40, of West Bloomfield.

Along with the City of Detroit and Duncan Solutions, both Norman White, director of Detroit’s Municipal Parking Department, and James Canty, Jr., manager of Detroit’s Parking Violations Bureau, are named as defendants.

EDITOR'S NOTE: The writer of this story has received parking citations in the city of Detroit since the summer of 2014.

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