How Metro Detroit olympians managed to keep training through COVID pandemic

Four elite athletes shared thoughts

Four elite athletes put in the work despite the coronavirus pandemic even though the Olympics were postponed.
Four elite athletes put in the work despite the coronavirus pandemic even though the Olympics were postponed.

Four elite athletes put in the work despite the coronavirus pandemic even though the Olympics were postponed.

Athletes had to put their lives on hold and train for another year when the postponement was announced. Gyms, tracks and fields were closed for safety concerns.

READ: Tokyo Olympics opening ceremonies will air live in US

Olympian Cindy Sember said that when University of Michigan facilities shut down last year, she and her sister, Tiffany Porter found ways to train outdoors as much as possible.

“Had to train on hills or train on grass,” Sember said. “In summer when it’s warm outside ... Train at high schools with their hurdles,” she said.

Weightlifter Katerine Nye had great timing. In January of 2020, she completed work on her garage gym setup.

Softball player Amanda Chidester said she did what a lot of people did -- purchased home workout equipment.

Timing is everything in track and field. The slightest change of a routine can have a detrimental impact.

For Chidester, not being able to swing the bat and hit was a disadvantage. For Nye, not competing due to multiple cancelled competitions was a drawback. But all the athletes kept a great perspective and were willing to adjust.

READ: More Olympic coverage


About the Authors:

Jamie anchors sports coverage on Local 4 News Saturdays at 6 & 11 p.m. and Sunday at 6 p.m., in addition to hosting Sports Final Edition.

Kayla is a Web Producer for ClickOnDetroit. Before she joined the team in 2018 she worked at WILX in Lansing as a digital producer.