Board governing Michigan Catastrophic Claims fund votes to send checks back to drivers

Whitmer expects checks to be worth around $600 per policy

Refunds are coming. That’s the word from the board governing the Michigan Catastrophic Claims fund.

DETROIT – Refunds are coming. That’s the word from the board governing the Michigan Catastrophic Claims fund.

On Monday, Michigan Gov. Gretchen Whitmer called on the MCCA to start sending checks back to consumers. Whitmer said the fund is sitting on a $5 billion surplus. The MCCA agreed.

Details on the specific amount per vehicle, along with a proposed timeline and logistics will be announced in the next several weeks Whitmer expects the refund checks to be worth around $600 per policy.

“Our rudimentary numbers look like it’s about $600 per policy. A $600 check in pocket. That can make or break a family that is living paycheck to paycheck,” Whitmer said.

The Michigan Brain Injury Provider Council has complained fee schedules instituted because of no fault reform is hurting service providers to those with catastrophic injuries. The group agrees refunds are needed.

“Where has she (Whitmer) been when it comes to advocating for legislative change to keep auto accident survivors -- some of whom are completely paralyzed and need to be turned every two hours -- from losing their care?” The Michigan Brain Injury Provider Council said in a statement.

The MCCA is a private nonprofit association that was created to reimburse no-fault insurance companies for Personal Injury Protection (PIP) medical claims paid in excess of a set amount under policies of insurance providing unlimited lifetime coverage. That was until auto insurance reform was enacted in 2020.

Read: MCCA votes to support Whitmer request for Michigan auto insurance refunds


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Kayla is a Web Producer for ClickOnDetroit. Before she joined the team in 2018 she worked at WILX in Lansing as a digital producer.