‘The system failed everybody that day’: Father of Oxford shooting victim Tate Myre honors son with 42 Strong nonprofit

‘We need to start making this mental health thing a priority,’ Buck Myre says

The father of Tate Myre, one of the four students killed during the Oxford school shooting, is opening up about the loss his family has experienced. Tate Myre, 16, has been described as a leader, an awesome friend and a great brother. His life was cut short when police say a 15-year-old gunman opened fire at the school. Tate Myre’s father is working to ensure his son’s legacy will live on.

OXFORD, Mich. – The father of Tate Myre, one of the four students killed during the Oxford school shooting, is opening up about the loss his family has experienced.

Tate Myre, 16, has been described as a leader, an awesome friend and a great brother. His life was cut short when police say a 15-year-old gunman opened fire at the school. Tate Myre’s father is working to ensure his son’s legacy will live on.

The Myre family has found a way to honor Tate Myre with “42 Strong.” William “Buck” Myre opened up about that and shared how he feels about the suspected shooter and his parents.


Watch: Extended interview with Oxford school shooting victim Tate Myre’s father


Students returned to Oxford High School just a few weeks ago. Parts of the building were remodeled like new, but many of the old scars remain.

There are still many reminders of the day of the shooting. While life is moving forward for other people, for Buck and Sheri Myre, time seems to be standing still.

“Everything came to a screeching halt in one day. There’s a build-up. With our oldest boy, Trent, graduations coming, and the last football game and then last wrestling match and then there’s a build-up. It’s coming, right. And same with Ty. And Tate. We still had half a year, plus a full year. So there were so many more memories to be made and just like that, it’s over. We have no more memories to make,” Buck Myre said.

Buck Myre wants someone to be held accountable for the death of his son and the deaths of the three other students.

Police say 15-year-old Ethan Crumbley opened fire at Oxford High School on Nov. 30, 2021. He is facing charges as an adult. His parents, James and Jennifer Crumbley are facing several charges related to the shooting.

“I don’t like to use their name. But the shooter did not have very good mentors. It’s obvious, what we’ve all read and learned, right? But obviously, they’re part of the puzzle. No doubt. They didn’t take any time with him, they were out doing their thing, and he’s doing his thing. They’ve got a weapon that they just bought and they know that he’s not in a good state of mind and they should have a pulse on that as parents, and they didn’t. They don’t care, right? So, yeah, I’m angry at them for sure,” Buck Myre said.”

“If they were here now, would you have something you’d want to say to them?” Sandra Ali asked.

“I don’t know. It’s a great question. I’ll see them someday and I’ll say it. But I don’t know what I’ll say. It’ll come from my heart because that’s the kind of person I am. When it comes to Nov. 30, something went wrong and there needs to be accountability. There has to be accountability because that’s how change happens,” Buck Myre said.

That’s why he started 42 Strong, a nonprofit in honor of Tate Myre, to mentor students who need support.

“This kid was raising his hand all day long, crying out for help. Now, he didn’t just come out and say, ‘Hey I need help,’ but look at the stuff that’s out there. He was raising his hand. Parents did nothing about it, school did nothing about it. The system failed him. The system failed everybody that day. So, how can we change that? We need to start making this mental health thing a priority. That kid had nothing. He had zero purpose in his life. That’s why Nov. 30 happened. He had zero purpose,” Buck Myre said.

Buck Myre said it’s too soon to decide if he’s going to attend the criminal trial. For now, he’s taking it one day at a time.

“So he gets tried as an adult, and he gets prosecuted, and he’s in for life. And then the parents, they get a life sentence. Whatever. It doesn’t matter. Tate’s not coming home. Do I want there to be justice? Yes. Do I want them to walk? No. But at the end of the day, Tate’s not coming home,” Buck Myre said.

Read: Complete Oxford High School shooting coverage

Watch part one of this interview series below:

The father of Tate Myre, one of the four students killed during the Oxford School shooting, is opening up about the loss his family has experienced. Tate Myre, 16, has been described as a leader, an awesome friend and a great brother. His life was cut short when police say a 15-year-old gunman opened fire at the school. Tate Myre’s father is working to ensure his son’s legacy will live on. William “Buck” Myre spoke to Local 4 about the loss and shared how his family is trying to move through the heartbreak to bring good to others.

About the Authors:

Kayla is a Web Producer for ClickOnDetroit. Before she joined the team in 2018 she worked at WILX in Lansing as a digital producer.