Michigan SOS Jocelyn Benson assures public of election integrity in pre-election news briefing

Michigan Secretary of State Jocelyn Benson held a pre-election news conference on Thursday, Nov. 3, to provide information before people head to the polls next week. Benson reassured the public that the integrity of the election process remains in tact, and that voters should expect a delay in election results.

DETROIT – Michigan Secretary of State Jocelyn Benson held a live news conference Thursday morning ahead of the general election on Tuesday, Nov. 8.

This live stream has ended. You can watch the entire briefing in the video player above.

Here’s what you missed: Michigan SOS: Expect general election results the day after Election Day

Benson shared election information with less than one week until Election Day. On Nov. 8, Michigan voters will be deciding the state’s next governor, secretary of state and attorney general, among other local races.

The current secretary of state reiterated that the upcoming election will follow protocols and remain secure, despite allegations of fraud that have been made previously, and are already being made before Election Day. Benson also warned residents to be aware that false claims of election fraud are designed to sow doubts about election integrity, but reassured the public that the integrity of the election process remains in tact.

Benson also said that election results may not be completed until the afternoon or evening on Wednesday, Nov. 4, the day after Election Day.

Know before you vote: Michigan Voter Guide 2022: Get to know key races, ballot proposals before voting

Voting in Michigan has been underway for weeks with absentee voting and early in-person voting. According to Benson’s office, as of Tuesday, more than 1.1 million absentee ballots had already been returned ahead of Election Day. Nearly two million absentee ballots had been requested as of that time.

The conference comes as people poll workers in Michigan express concerns about how some election workers were trained to disobey election laws if they feel election integrity is in “jeopardy.” Such issues have been common since the 2020 election, when former President Donald Trump and his supporters falsely claimed the 2020 presidential election was stolen when now-President Joe Biden won.


Read more: Michigan general election 2022: What to expect on election night, results


About the Author:

Cassidy Johncox is a senior digital news editor covering stories across the spectrum, with a special focus on politics and community issues.