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Rare syndrome affecting children appears to be linked to coronavirus (COVID-19)

Syndrome blamed for at least 4 deaths

DETROIT – There is a syndrome affecting some children that appears to be linked to coronavirus (COVID-19). It’s being blamed for at least three deaths in New York and one in England.

The syndrome is rare, but doctors are seeing it in some children in Michigan. Children’s Hospital reported 15 to 20 cases over the past two weeks. Beaumont said they’ve seen a few cases too. Mott’s Children’s Hospital also had one possible case.

That’s why Dr. Rudolph Valentini, DMC Group Chief Medical Officer, wants parents to be on guard for signs of Pediatric Multi-System Inflammatory Syndrome.

READ: Experts concerned about rare, devastating coronavirus (COVID-19) complications in children

There have been 85 reported cases in New York state. Cases have also been identified in 10 other states and Washington D.C. There have been at least 50 cases in European countries.

The symptoms in younger children include fever (lasting at least 2 days), a rash, red or peeling palms or soles, red and cracked lips, and red inflamed eyes. Children may also have a strawberry red tongue.

MORE: Doctors warn rare syndrome sickening Michigan kids

Older children and teens tend to have more subtle symptoms including fever (lasting more than 48 hours), a rash, or gastrointestinal such as abdominal pain or diarrhea. In some kids it has progressed to toxic chock and heart failure.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and New York state are working on a criteria that can be used nationwide to identify the disease.

Experts believe the syndrome may result from an unusual inflammatory reaction to the coronavirus. It may appear several weeks after the initial infection -- even in children who never showed symptoms for coronavirus.

Most children are recovering but if you notice symptoms call your pediatrician immediately.

READ: Deadly mystery illness that could be linked to COVID-19 killed New York children, similar cases reported in other countries


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