FDA halts use of monoclonal antibodies that don’t work against omicron variant

Monoclonal antibodies held promise early in the COVID pandemic

Treatments for people who have become infected with COVID are also being touted by officials as another way for us to reduce the toll COVID-19 is exacting.

Treatments for people who have become infected with COVID are also being touted by officials as another way for us to reduce the toll COVID-19 is exacting.

But is the promise of the drugs meeting the reality for infected patients? Local 4′s Dr. Frank McGeorge explains the most serious problem with them.

Read: DeSantis blasts FDA for halting drugs ineffective on omicron

If you develop COVID and have risk factors for developing severe illness, there are treatments available -- monoclonal antibodies, pills like PAXLOVID and Molnupiravir, and now even Remdesivir can be given to patients without being hospitalized.

Monoclonal antibodies from Regeneron and Bamlanivimab held tremendous promise early in the pandemic. They were even used to treat then President Donald Trump when he was infected.

Several variants later with mutations rendering them useless against the dominant omicron, the FDA Has effectively revoked the emergency use authorization for these medications. There is still one remaining monoclonal antibody still considered effective against omicron, Sotrovimab.

Read: Complete Michigan COVID coverage


About the Authors:

Dr. McGeorge can be seen on Local 4 News helping Metro Detroiters with health concerns when he isn't helping save lives in the emergency room at Henry Ford Hospital.

Kayla is a Web Producer for ClickOnDetroit. Before she joined the team in 2018 she worked at WILX in Lansing as a digital producer.