FBI director: No evidence of antifa, ‘fake’ Trump supporters in US Capitol attack

Wray calls attack domestic terrorism

FBI Director Christopher Wray testifies before the Senate Judiciary Committee on Capitol Hill in Washington, Tuesday, March 2, 2021. (Mandel Ngan/Pool via AP) (AFP)

FBI director Christopher Wray testified before the Senate on Tuesday for the first time since the attack on the U.S. Capitol on Jan. 6.

Wray’s message to lawmakers was clear: The attack on the Capitol was domestic terrorism -- and it’s a growing problem.

“We view the events of January 6 as domestic terrorism,” Wray said. “It’s got no place in our democracy, and tolerating it would make a mockery of our country’s rule of law.”

“When it comes to racially motivated violent extremism, the number of investigations and number of arrests has grown significantly on my watch,” Wray said, noting attacks by white supremacists “was almost triple the number it was in my first year.”

Wray also debunked conspiracy theories being promoted by some GOP lawmakers claiming subscribers of antifa were behind the Capitol attack.

“We have not, to date, seen any evidence of anarchist violent extremists or people subscribing to Antifa in connection with the 6th,” Wray told Senate lawmakers.

Wray also dispelled the conspiracy that “fake Trump supporters” were behind the attack. “We have not seen evidence of that at this stage.”

Michigan GOP Leader Mike Shirkey had claimed in recent weeks that the group at the Capitol “wasn’t Trump people,” and called it a prearranged hoax. Shirkey also falsely suggested then-U.S. Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell had a part in it.

Related: Michigan Sen. Shirkey defends controversial comments on Jackson radio show

More: FBI chief calls Jan. 6 ‘domestic terrorism,’ defends intel


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