SHOW MORE 

Metro Detroit weather: Frigid Saturday night, chilly Sunday

Lows in the teens and low 20s

Metro Detroit weather: Frigid Saturday night, chilly Sunday, March 6, 2021, 11 p.m. update
Metro Detroit weather: Frigid Saturday night, chilly Sunday, March 6, 2021, 11 p.m. update

DETROIT – Welcome to Saturday night, Motown.

It was sunny earlier, and it will be clear tonight. It becomes frigid overnight. Tomorrow will be chilly. Higher temperatures will be evident the rest of next week.

Saturday night will be clear and very cold. Overnight lows return to the teens and low 20s.

If you missed seeing Jupiter and Saturn this morning, you can see the two planets tomorrow between 5:45 and 6:15 a.m.

Sunrise is at 6:58 a.m.

Sunday will have plenty of sun too. Still seasonably chilly with highs in the low 40s. In men’s college basketball, Michigan takes on MSU in East Lansing at 4:30 p.m.

Monday will be bright and milder. Highs will be in the middle and upper 50s.

Tuesday will be even warmer with mostly sunny skies and daytime temps reaching the low 60s.

Wednesday and Thursday have a chance of showers; not snow, but rain. It remains pretty warm. Highs will be near 60 degrees each day with early-morning lows in the 40s or near 50 degrees.

Friday will have leftover showers in the morning. During the day temperatures will reach the upper 50s.

Daylight Saving Time (no “S”) begins next weekend. Saturday and Sunday will be chillier with highs in the 40s to near 50°F each day. Remember to spring forward by moving your clocks ahead one hour from Saturday night into Sunday. Also, it’s a great idea to change all the batteries and all of your alarms.

Remember to download the FREE Local4Casters weather app -- it’s easily one of the best in the nation. Just search your app store under WDIV and it’s right there available for both iPhones and Androids! Or click the appropriate link below.


About the Author:

Andrew Humphrey is an Emmy Award winning meteorologist, and also an AMS Certified Broadcast Meteorologist (CBM). He has a BSE in Meteorology from the University of Michigan and an MS in Meteorology from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, where he wrote his thesis on "The Behavior of the Total Mass of the Atmosphere."