43ºF

When is the last day to request a Michigan absentee ballot for the 2020 presidential election?

Election Day for U.S. General Election is Nov. 3

A person drops into a mail box applications for mail-in ballots, in Omaha, Neb., Tuesday, Aug. 18, 2020. (AP Photo/Nati Harnik)
A person drops into a mail box applications for mail-in ballots, in Omaha, Neb., Tuesday, Aug. 18, 2020. (AP Photo/Nati Harnik) (Copyright 2020 The Associated Press. All rights reserved)

Voting in the 2020 U.S. presidential election is already underway in Michigan with early in-person voting and absentee voting.

Michigan polling precincts will still be open for in-person voting from 7 a.m. to 8 p.m. on November 3 amid the coronavirus pandemic -- but, if you’d prefer to vote without the crowds, there is still time to request an absent voter ballot. All Michigan voters are eligible to vote using an absent voter ballot.

You can apply to receive an absent voter ballot on the state’s website right here. Requests for Michigan absentee ballots must be received by your local clerk’s office no later than 5 p.m. on the Friday before the election -- which would October 30 for the November 3 election.

Michigan voters registered to vote at their current address can request an absentee ballot in person at their local clerk’s office anytime up to 4 p.m. on the day before Election Day -- which is November 2.

Michigan also allows same-day voter registration -- meaning you can register to vote on the day of the election. Michigan residents registering to vote or updating their current address at their local clerk’s office on November 3 can also request an absent voter ballot at that time.

Note: Michigan voters requesting absent voter ballots in person on November 2-3 must vote the ballot immediately while in the clerk’s office on the day of your visit.

Once completed, your absentee ballot must be returned to your local clerk’s office no later than 8 p.m. on Election Day, November 3.

Because Election Day is quickly approaching, officials are urging residents who vote absentee to return their completed ballots in person -- not by mail -- to ensure that they arrive in time and are counted in the election.

  • Postal delivery services have been delayed recently throughout Michigan and the U.S. Returning a completed absent voter ballot by mail in Michigan this close to the election will not guarantee that it is received by your local clerk’s office on time to be counted.

To check on the status of an absent voter ballot application, registered Michigan voters are encouraged to contact their city or township clerk’s office directly.

Learn more about voting by mail in Michigan for the 2020 General Election here.

How to register to vote in Michigan

Michigan residents can register to vote at any time up to 8 p.m. on Election Day -- November 3 -- at their city or township clerk’s office. If you choose to register to vote with your local clerk in person after October 30, you will be required to vote the ballot in-person at that time.

It is too late to register to vote in Michigan using any other method. Those interested in registering to vote must do so in person.

If you move to a new city or township, you must re-register to vote in that area. If you move within a city or township and are already registered to vote, you only need to update your address with the city/township clerk.

If you have a valid Michigan driver’s license or state ID you can use the online form to register to vote or update your voter registration address in Michigan.

Voter registration is a 5-step process in Michigan. Click the links below to learn more about each step.

  1. Verify you are eligible
  2. Fill out an application
  3. Submit your application
  4. City/township clerk processes application
  5. You are registered!

Be prepared: What to know before voting in General Election in Michigan on Nov. 3, 2020


Note: In-person voting in at Michigan precincts will still be available for the 2020 General Election on Nov. 3, even amid the coronavirus pandemic. Face coverings are not required to be worn at polling precincts, but are still encouraged to help prevent the spread of the virus.


About the Author: