Detroit opens vaccinations to residents 50 and older

Detroit Health Department confident it can take on more vaccinations

Mayor Mike Duggan announced Thursday that Detroiters with chronic conditions who are at least 50 years old can get appointments to get vaccinated.
Mayor Mike Duggan announced Thursday that Detroiters with chronic conditions who are at least 50 years old can get appointments to get vaccinated.

DETROIT – Starting Monday, any Michigan residents age 50 and up with pre-existing medical conditions or disabilities will be eligible to make an appointment for the COVID-19 vaccine.

READ: 6 Q&As on Michigan’s expansion of COVID-19 vaccine plan to 50+

The city of Detroit isn’t going to wait until Monday. Mayor Mike Duggan announced Thursday that Detroiters with chronic conditions who are at least 50 years old can get appointments to get vaccinated.

Residents have to show proof of their illness -- like a doctor’s note -- but the city feels it’s capable of taking on a new group of people after the Detroit Health Department administered its 100,000th vaccine Thursday.

While it’s certainly another positive sign, the city also wants people to still be careful.

READ: Michigan COVID-19 vaccinations: How to find appointments, info on phases


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Jason anchors Local 4's 5:30 p.m. newscast. He joined WDIV in January 2015 as a general assignment reporter and has a Journalism degree from Michigan State University.

Dane is a producer and media enthusiast. He previously worked freelance video production and writing jobs in Michigan, Georgia and Massachusetts. Dane graduated from the Specs Howard School of Media Arts.