Is there a nasal spray vaccine? Can ivermectin be used as a treatment or preventative for COVID?

Both FDA and WHO recommend against the use of ivermectin to fight COVID-19

Since the coronavirus pandemic began, Dr. Frank McGeorge has been keeping viewers up-to-date and informed on all fronts. He’s been answering your questions about the vaccine, the vaccination process and more.
Since the coronavirus pandemic began, Dr. Frank McGeorge has been keeping viewers up-to-date and informed on all fronts. He’s been answering your questions about the vaccine, the vaccination process and more.

DETROIT – Since the coronavirus pandemic began, Dr. Frank McGeorge has been keeping viewers up-to-date and informed on all fronts. He’s been answering your questions about the vaccine, the vaccination process and more.

Read: More answers to questions about coronavirus


I have heard scientists are developing a nasal spray vaccine and an oral vaccine. If so, how soon do you think those would be developed, approved and be available in our area?

Vaccines like this that being developed, but research is so preliminary that it is unknown how safe or effective they might be, or if they would come to the market. The shots will be the only option for a long time.

Can ivermectin be used as a treatment or preventative for COVID-19?

Ivermectin is a medication most that is often used to treat parasites in animals. In humans, it is approved for topical application to treat head lice and a condition called rosacea, and orally to treat certain parasites that can infect humans.

There has been interest in using it to treat COVID after researchers found high concentrations could inhibit SARS-CoV-2 replication in test tube experiments, but the limited human data does not suggest it’s helpful.

Both the FDA and WHO recommend against the use of ivermectin against COVID-19, but there are studies looking into it.

Unvaccinated family members say I shouldn’t wear a mask because I’m vaccinated, the numbers are down and they won’t get sick if they catch it. How do I keep our kids -- who aren’t eligible for vaccination yet -- safe?

It is true that if you are vaccinated, the chances of bringing the infection home to your children is extremely low. It’s also true that the numbers are going down and young children tend to tolerate a COVID infection better than adults. However, only you can decide what is safest for your children. The current risk is not zero.

Until they can be vaccinated, your kids will certainly be more protected by wearing masks and not eating in restaurants.

My husband and I are fully vaccinated since February. Do we still have to wipe down the groceries and wait 4 days to read the newspaper/magazine?

No. The risk of COVID from surfaces is much lower than thought. If you’re both fully vaccinated, you can drop those precautions.


Questions about coronavirus? Ask Dr. McGeorge


About the Authors:

Dr. McGeorge can be seen on Local 4 News helping Metro Detroiters with health concerns when he isn't helping save lives in the emergency room at Henry Ford Hospital.

Dane is a producer and media enthusiast. He previously worked freelance video production and writing jobs in Michigan, Georgia and Massachusetts. Dane graduated from the Specs Howard School of Media Arts.