CDC: 1 in 5 adults have health condition that might be linked to COVID illness

New study highlights concerns of ‘long COVID’

FILE - This undated, colorized electron microscope image made available by the U.S. National Institutes of Health in February 2020 shows the Novel Coronavirus SARS-CoV-2, indicated in yellow, emerging from the surface of cells, indicated in blue/pink, cultured in the lab. The sample was isolated from a patient in the U.S. On Thursday, April 21, 2022, scientists reported a U.K. patient with a severely weakened immune system had COVID-19 for almost a year and a half, underscoring the importance of protecting vulnerable people from the coronavirus. (NIAID-RML via AP, File) (Uncredited)

Kidney failure. Blood clots. Neurologic conditions. These are just a few of the commonly found health conditions developing in adults that previously had a confirmed COVID-19 infection.

The CDC released new data that shows COVID-19 survivors have twice the risk for developing pulmonary embolism or respiratory conditions; one in five COVID-19 survivors aged 18–64 years and one in four survivors aged ≥65 years experienced at least one incident condition that might be attributable to previous COVID-19.

The CDC says as more persons are exposed to and infected by SARS-CoV-2, reports of patients who experience persistent symptoms or organ dysfunction after acute COVID-19 and develop post-COVID conditions have increased.

CDC graphic. (CDC)

Issues post-COVID, commonly known as long COVID, has impacted millions of Americans who recovered from the infection itself. Answers about long COVID are still in short supply, and that’s leaving many people struggling to find the medical help they need. It’s still unclear why some people develop long COVID.

More: What ‘long COVID’ means and how it’s affecting millions

The CDC study released Tuesday analyzed thousands and thousands of people who had COVID-19 in the U.S., and followed their recovery and potential long COVID symptoms over time.

The CDC study released Tuesday analyzed thousands and thousands of people who had COVID-19 in the U.S., and followed their recovery and potential long COVID symD-19. Independent of age group, the highest risks were for acute pulmonary embolism and respiratory symptoms. Here’s more from the CDC:

The analysis was stratified by two age groups (persons aged 18–64 and ≥65 years). Patients were followed for 30–365 days after the index encounter until one or more incident conditions were observed or through October 31, 2021 (whichever occurred first). Among all patients aged ≥18 years, 38% of case-patients experienced an incident condition compared with 16% of controls; conditions affected multiple systems, and included cardiovascular, pulmonary, hematologic, renal, endocrine, gastrointestinal, musculoskeletal, neurologic, and psychiatric signs and symptoms.

By age group, the highest risk ratios (RRs) were for acute pulmonary embolism and respiratory signs and symptoms. Among those aged 18–64 years, 35.4% of case-patients experienced an incident condition compared with 14.6% of controls. Among those aged ≥65 years, 45.4% of case-patients experienced an incident condition compared with 18.5% of controls.

These findings translate to one in five COVID-19 survivors aged 18–64 years, and one in four survivors aged ≥65 years experiencing an incident condition that might be attributable to previous COVID-19. Implementation of COVID-19 prevention strategies, as well as routine assessment for post-COVID conditions among persons who survive COVID-19, is critical to reducing the incidence and impact of post-COVID, particularly among adults aged ≥65 years.

The CDC said implementation of COVID-19 prevention strategies, as well as routine assessment for post-COVID conditions among persons who survive COVID-19, is critical to reducing the incidence and impact of post-COVID conditions, particularly among adults aged ≥65 years.

Read the full CDC report below:


About the Author:

Ken Haddad is the digital content and audience manager for WDIV / ClickOnDetroit.com. He also authors the Morning Report Newsletter and various other newsletters. He's been with WDIV since 2013. He enjoys suffering through Lions games on Sundays in the fall.