Great Lakes Water Authority: Multiple pumps weren’t working night of the floods

Power was restored, but damage had already been done

Officials with the Great Lakes Water Authority confirmed Friday that multiple pumps were not in operation the night of the flooding and have agreed to launch an investigation to find out way.
Officials with the Great Lakes Water Authority confirmed Friday that multiple pumps were not in operation the night of the flooding and have agreed to launch an investigation to find out way.

DETROIT – What happened to the pumps on Detroit’s east side on the night of the floods?

Officials with the Great Lakes Water Authority confirmed Friday that multiple pumps were not in operation the night of the flooding and have agreed to launch an investigation to find out way.



Many people in Metro Detroit are dealing with a flooded basement, sewage, stress, costly damages, destroyed family photos and more.

Great Lakes Water Authority CEO Sue McCormick was questioned Friday regarding the newly-upgraded storm pumps that were supposed to pump waste and rain waters away.

Did the pumps on Detroit’s east side work? No. Power was lost to the Freud Pumping Station on Friday morning -- three of six pumps were operating.

At the massive Conner Creek station, it lost internal power and an electrician on site got six pumps going eventually, but sewage pipes were already flooding and damage had already been done.

You can watch Shawn Ley’s full story in the video above.


About the Authors:

Shawn Ley is an Emmy-Award winning reporter. In more than 20 years covering stories in television news, Shawn’s reporting has taken him from war-torn eastern Europe, to reporting from an F-16 fighter jet and now to the fast and furious breaking news of Detroit.

Dane is a producer and media enthusiast. He previously worked freelance video production and writing jobs in Michigan, Georgia and Massachusetts. Dane graduated from the Specs Howard School of Media Arts.